sound proof a room from aircraft landing overhead

I have a 1000sq ft room on the 2nd floor that has good noise isolation all around the 4 walls. However the roof of the building does not have good sound insulation. It only has R-19 foil backed batts.
I like to select a ceiling tile that has good sound proof properties so that the noise from the overhead aircraft can be cut as much as possible. The use of the room is just for general office use, and occansionally voice recording.
Can anyone suggest an exact make and model of ceiling tiles that we can use? Something that has a high CAC value and a normal NRC level.
The ceiling is about 10' above the floor and we will be using 2' x 4' tiles.
THanks
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On 21 Oct 2005 12:35:19 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I don't think you're going to have much luck controlling aircraft noise with just ceiling tiles. At the very least, I'd put in sound isolation channels (much like furring strips), and then a layer of Homasote 440, covered by something heavier, like cement-board. (Or maybe swap the homasote/cement board)
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Earplugs. Fifty cents.
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Your daft if you think that adding in ceiling tiles is going to make any real difference. See the other posts for what will work, IMO.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

That is a tough one. Around here they had to set up some homes to reduce the noise and it ran several thousands of dollars per home. They used extra thick, window glass, special sound proofing materials in all exterior wills and an number of other tricks. That noise is a little different than most and harder to stop. It will be coming in from more than the ceiling.
Here is a good source for ideas and maybe even supplies.
http://www.soundproofing.org /
In general you want to block air exchange. Air caries sound very well. (Try opening your car's window as a train is going by.)
Next you want weight. Heavy things (drywall, lead sheets etc.) block sound well.
You also want to prevent any direct solid connections. Stagger wall studs or use special isolation devices to keep the sound from traveling through the wall (remember the two cans on a string (well wire actuarially worked) you want to break the wire).
Filling in wall cavities with sound absorbing materials (accustical fiberglass bats) will do a little.
--
Joseph Meehan

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