Sound insulation with soft strips?


Hi,
I have posted a sound insulation question before a received a lot of useful information.
I would like to revisit it one more time. I'm trying to sound insulate a second floor bedroom from the kitchen directly below it. The bedroom has 3/4 pine nailed directly to the joists.
So I'd like to ask a very specific question. Is there some kind of soft material that I can add to the kitchen ceiling joists as strips that will absorb acoustic energy and therefore act as sound insulation (at the same time not affect the structural integrity of the ceiling drywall.
Many thanks in advance,
Sam
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Short answer, no. Laws of physics make it improbable. Do more research. It's possible, but expensive depending on the goals you set.
Joe
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Isn't there a type of caulk that is supposed to be acustically absorbant?
I've never used it before, I just seem to remember reading about it.
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Check the Homasote web page, the solution appears to be layers of Homasote/resilient channels/drywall on the ceiling.

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In music studios for real soundproofing rooms are built inside rooms without anything touching, a friend who has built them said a bead of caulk was used on the studs before drywall was attached, I know a drywaller that also does this. Im sure any caulk will work, let it harden first. But this is only the smallest part of a sound deadening job, double drywall would help more as would other things you need to research, there is drywall designed to reduce sound and fiberglass insulation that would be special orders.
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Sam Takoy wrote the following:

the joists.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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As you was told the last time you asked there are no magic simple answers...Adding soft strips of cloth or caulking will do nothing....I'm sure others will re-post the same answers as before and they were good ones but I'm not gonna bother...You already know the answers....You just don't want to do the work....HTH...
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benick wrote:

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The easiest thing to do is carpet the bedrooom floor!!!!!!
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wrote:

What kind of sound is being transmitted? Did you try eliminating the source of the sound? Insulating for sound is very specific and the most effective barrier will involve more than one step. A small hole along side a pipe will transmit sound, so caulking or using expanding foam is your first step. Seal around heating ducts, electrical holes, etc. Then, (loosely) fill the voids with poly batting or fiberglass insulation. Sound deadening can cost much less during new construction or renovation. Where I live they test loud sirens every first Wednesday of the month for 5 minutes (every dog starts howling too)--annoying but not much can be done here except ear plugs or relocation.
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