Something to keep water from ceiling tiles

I have a business in a rental space and every time it rains a lot, small d rips of water come through the roof and ruin some of my ceiling tiles. I ha ve been unable to get the land lord to fix the problem. Is there some sort of sponge layer I can put above the tiles and insulation to absorb this wat er? It is not a lot of water, just enough to soak through and stain a tile.
Thanks.
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If you know where the leaks are, perhaps you can use some plastic sheeting and make a funnel of sorts to direct the water to a place where you can collect it.
When I had water infiltration due to a serious ice dam issue, the water would drip all along a couple of doorways, I hung plastic sheeting in a "U" shape to direct the water to one side of the doorway and into a bucket.
Collect the water and whenever the landlords come around, throw it at them until they fix the problem. ;-)
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Rental space? Landlord won't fix the problem? Have it fixed and deduct the cost from your rent or withhold rent until he fixes the problem. Wonder what kinda lease/rental agreement you have..... We have small specialty retail operation in a strip mall(part of big shopping complex) If such thing happens, it's a matter of phone call to the property management(landlord's agent).
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On 2014-03-04 6:48 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

renting off of a charity who is giving us a great rate (they are supporting the non-profit).
Sometimes playing hard-ass with the landlord doesn't get you anywhere ;)
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On 3/4/2014 7:03 PM, Adam Kubias wrote:

Not very charitable of them to have you work in a dump. Being a charity or a "non profit" does not release them from either the moral or legal obligation to provide a safe environment.
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I like the plastic sheet idea. If you can narrow the places down even more, maybe some aluminum gutters will catch it.

Better read your lease AND see a lawyer before you do either of these. Some states allow such things for residential renters, but in other states it's a thruway to eviction land. AIUI, commercial leases and laws tend to be even harder on tenants.
Remember that withholding rent is verrrrry much like not paying your rent. And deducting the cost from your rent payment is verrrry much like not paying all your rent, which is usually as bad legally as not paying any of it.

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On Wednesday, March 5, 2014 2:22:40 AM UTC-6, micky wrote:

. I have been unable to get the land lord to fix the problem. Is there some sort of sponge layer I can put above the tiles and insulation to absorb th is water? It is not a lot of water, just enough to soak through and stain a tile.

Anyone have any experience with this product?
http://www.newpig.com/pig/US/patch-repair-maintenance-7240/pig-leak-diverte rs-7241/pig-ceiling-panel-leak-catcher-7349/0/20
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On Thursday, May 22, 2014 11:59:54 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

es. I have been unable to get the land lord to fix the problem. Is there so me sort of sponge layer I can put above the tiles and insulation to absorb this water? It is not a lot of water, just enough to soak through and stain a tile.

Now ain't that something. While everyone was telling you that the place is falling down and the roof needs to be fixed, you've actually found a product just made for your problem. Seems like kind of a nutty product to me, with possible ban consequences, ie mold, but heh, if it works for you in a rental, go for it.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com;3206492 Wrote:

If it wuz me, I would remove the ceiling tiles in the area where the leak occurs and paint the back side and edges of them with boiled linseed oil. You might want to mask off the white bottoms of the tiles to prevent getting BLO on them.
Allow several days for the BLO to dry. It'll take just as long as those old linseed oil based paints to dry.
The BLO will seal the tile and prevent water from being absorbed into it. The water up there will then either evaporate, or seep down between the tiles (which is why you want to paint the edges of the tiles with BLO, too.)
You might also consider using a two part clear liquid epoxy as well, but it's just not as user friendly as BLO. With the epoxy, once mixed it's gonna harden, and so you have to guestimate how much to mix up before hand.
PS: It's a popular misconception that oil based coatings yellow with age. Yellowing only occurs when there's a lack of sunlight hitting the coating. Exposure to direct or indirect sunlight will be sufficient to prevent yellowing in any oil based coating. So, if you don't need to turn the lights on in your rental space during the day, that'll be enough indirect sunlight to prevent the BLO from yellowing with age.
--
nestork

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On 3/4/2014 7:01 PM, nestork wrote:

I'd be careful with any kind of natural oil, that might spontaneous combust. Of course a flat surface isn't crumpled rags in the corners. But even so.
Some hardware stores sell a spray can called Kilz Upshot, which does a good job of masking the water damge. Can sprays upright, and is near the same color as the tiles. I've used it with success.
If you coat the tiles with BLO, would you use a BLO dryer on it?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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On 3/4/2014 4:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

http://www.newpig.com/pig/US/patch-repair-maintenance-7240/pig-leak-diverters-7241 or make your own with plastic. Though, they are shown fastened below the ceiling tiles, you can also fasten them above if there's plenty of space between as well as places to fasten them.
If the leak(s) isn't heavy, you can simply put a bucket or some other catch pan above the ceiling tiles. I suggest using a piece of wood or some other cross supports to rest on the grids, then put the pan/bucket on it. If you forget about it or the leak is constant, you want to avoid having it come through the ceiling tile when weight is applied.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes:

Landlord is nuts.
A water leak will eventually bring the ceiling down.
Next time you talk to the landlord you should mention that this is going to cost a lot more money if it isn't fixed soon.
--
Dan Espen

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