Some concrete advice

Planning to pour a walkway between my garage and my neighbor's yard.
On my neighbor's side is a four-foot-high cinder block retaining wall. My side is a windowless stuccoed garage wall. The walkway is five feet wide, forty feet long. I want to put concrete edge-to-edge along the entire width and length. No fancy flagstone, weathered brick, herringbone patio pavers. Just plain old gray brushed concrete.
I have several questions that perhaps some of you kind people can answer for me.
First: how does one build forms for this kind of job? Basically, the concrete walkway will extend from the footing of my neighbor's cinderblock wall five feet across to the footing of my concrete slab garage floor. No edge forms needed, or do I need expansion joints at those points in addition to those placed laterally along its length? A line of benderboard between walkway and wall(s)?
Second: how does one screed a pour like this? There is no edge-to-edge "play" that I can drag a screed board across to ensure a smooth, level surface. The cinderblock and the garage wall are in the way. (This one REALLY puzzles me.)
Third: Drainage. My neighbor's yard is uphill of mine. When it rains hard, runoff pours from his back yard into my back yard and out this walkway to the street. (My neighbor is a plumber. After the last hard rains, he installed a drainage system that he claims will eliminate this problem. But, weather is freakish, and I'd like to ensure that whatever his drainage system can't handle, mine will.) Of course, the walkway will slope towards the street. I'm also planning a drainage channel on his side of the walk equivalent to 2" pipe, so the water will run away from my garage, down this channel, against his wall, to the street below. The walkway will have a double slope: one towards the street and one towards this channel. Does anyone see any problems with this scheme?
Many thanks for any and all useful advice.
-chib
--
(email: change out to in)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A two inch gutter sounds small and hard to maintain. Check to see if your foundation is wood down to grade and what you might be covering up: I saw a walk just like this that allowed water to get trapped against the wood/stucco & it was a problem. A 6 or 12" gravel filled edge along the garage might be more forgiving and give room for repairs (and weeds) and a buried perf drain if necessary.
chibiabos wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can put expansion joint material along your garage and his wall. Snap chaulklines and nail the strips right into the concrete and you can use this as your guide to screed on. The pro just snap the chauk lines and screed to this line with nothing to rest the screed on. This works great for the pros but it isn't as easy as it looks. I would go with the expansion joint along both walls and others at 8-10 ft intervals. As far as putting a 2 inch channel at yhe wall side I wouldnt bother, it will only get plugged up with dirt and leaves and be an eyesore and constant maintainance problem. Just give the walk plenty of pitch away from your garage and towards the street and it will be fine. 1/4 inch per ft is the norm but if you have that much water you may want to go a little more away from your garage like maybe 1 1/2 - 2 inches. Good Luck Rick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Strength of Materials Prof said "If you're 'pouring' concrete it will be weak. Should have minimum water so it is 'placed'".
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Please let your prof know that I'm "placing" concrete. Also ask him if the boys down at the batch plant look at him funny when he walks in.
-chib
--
(email: change out to in)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

That's what I'd use forms for: put one by right up against the garage footing and the cinderblock. Make sure it's pitched correctly (see below) and then that space will provide your expansion joint later on and will give you someting to screed on. Lust lay a board accorss the tops of the one by and drag. You won't be able to saw back and forth, so it'll be a bit harder but you can do it.

Nope. You may want to form the channel using a 2x3 on it's side and that can be the top of the form. Just pull the 2x3 after things have set up a bit and you'll have your gutter channel.
John
--
Remove the dead poet to e-mail, tho CC'd posts are unwelcome.
Ask me about joining the NRA.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PF> > Planning to pour a walkway between my garage and my neighbor's yard. PF> > Third: Drainage. My neighbor's yard is uphill of mine. When it rains PF> > hard, runoff pours from his back yard into my back yard and out this PF> > walkway to the street. PF> A two inch gutter sounds small and hard to maintain. Check to see if PF> your foundation is wood down to grade and what you might be covering up: PF> I saw a walk just like this that allowed water to get trapped against PF> the wood/stucco & it was a problem. A 6 or 12" gravel filled edge along PF> the garage might be more forgiving and give room for repairs (and weeds) PF> and a buried perf drain if necessary.
I would be inclined to put a perforated drainage tube or two buried in the gravel to expediate removal of the water during downpours.
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
* Stupid; politically correct. Chimney's clogged
--
RoseReader 2.52 P003186
The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA 563-359-1971
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.