Solidering #6 Wires Together

This is Turtle.
now before i start telling this even. i did not do it or will i ever do it. With this clear i will speak.
i was looking a air handler for a HVAC customer and he run the electric service hisself to the air handler and when he got to the A/H with the wire was about 6 feet short to get there. So he just got another piece of wire and SOLIDERED the # 6 -2 with ground Wire set together to complete the circuit to the A/H. I know this is illegal here in out local code but i can't find it in the NEC for not having a new copy.
So how bad is solidering # 6 copper wire for high amp draw in a slice joint?
TURTLE
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Soldering is legal, but the joint cannot depend on it. If you want to solder wires before clamping them together it is fine, as long as the clamp would be adequate without the solder. Presumably it is in a box, no?
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In canada u have to crimp. In states, who knows, u guys make up rules as u go. Like WMD in iraq and supplying isreal with nukes.

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Satman Crothers wrote:

Inasmuch as nascent Israleis were the originators of nukes (Einstein thru Teller), you've got it pretty much backwards.
Besides, we need Israel to protect us. Please note Israel can field 18 divisions of infantry and armor (deployed in combat, on three fronts, in 72 hours). The authorized strength of the US Army is ten divisions, the Marine Corps, two divisions. Israel's ground force is 50% larger than that of the United States.
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On Sat, 26 Nov 2005 10:26:39 -0600, HeyBub wrote:

Pure bullshit, on all counts.
--
If you\'re not on the edge, you\'re taking up too much space.
Linux Registered User #327951
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Asshole.
No place for politics here.
<PLONK>.
--
Jim McLaughlin

Reply address is deliberately munged.
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Generally for #6 you use split bolts and tape well. I assume this was stranded, because I can not see how solid could be soldered. I also hope this is in a box. If stranded, I suppose it could be soldered and taped, but I would not do it. Split bolts are the way to go, although I am thinking that the largest wirenuts available *might* work. I can only recall one time that I had to splice #6, and I used split bolts and in a deep 4" box. This was only because the run was 60 some feet and connected to existing wire. If the run was short, I'd just get all new wire because split bolts are costly.
Mark
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Toller wrote:

This is Turtle.
No it is in mid air in a closet !
No Clamp !
Just twisted , solidered together , and wrapped with electric tape.
It was done by a local country boy Sparkey with NO licences and told him solidering it was just fine.
TURTLE
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Personally, I'd contact the local inspectors. That's just plain dangerous. I dont like causing people trouble with the law, but in this case its for their own good,
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Personally, I'd just fix it. The inspector is going to insist it be fixed anyway so why involve him?
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wrote:

I completely agree, but the OP said it's not his own home and the homeowner DIY and feels he did the right thing. I'd at least tell the homeowner that the inspectors are going to find it eventyually and that it's not safe. If the connections were in a box, I'd feel much better about it.
If it were mine, I'd replace the wire with one full piece, or else place the joints into a box and use split bolts and tape. Just do whichever costs the least. Three split bolts, a box, and tape are already over $20. I have not bought #6 cable in awhile, but I guess around $1.50 a foot. A 20 foot run would cost $30 and save lots of work. Those shorter peices can still be used for other jobs. (or sold on ebay)
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TURTLE wrote:

Just my opinion:
I *might* solder (braze would be a more accurate term) a large grounded wire to splice it, but I would use high silver content (like 40% Ag) silver solder. Even if the joint were to heat up, it will not melt the silver solder and open the connection like it might with lead/tin solder. I would not use soft solder -- if I had a good enough mechanical connection to trust soft solder, it wouldn't need the solder.
Bob
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This is Turtle.
i don't trust soft solider for any electricial connection over 10 amps.
TURTLE
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Can"t for the life of me understand why anyone would go to the trouble of soldering.
Section 110-14 (b) in the 1999 NEC. Says soldering is permissible as long as the wire was twisted together so it is mechanically sound before the solder.
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I had to connect two solid #12 wires to stranded #8. I expect a wire nut would hold it all together, but it just didn't inspire confidence; so I soldered it all before putting the the wire nut on. Couldn't possibly come apart now.
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This is Turtle.
i was looking for a NEC spec that would cut it for a bunch of fires in this area has been started by solidering wires. About a year ago a fire burn the living room of a house pretty bad because of a solidered wires going to a window unit and on to a 220 volt plug in. The Local inspection here will cut it out but the other parts of the country will [ i guess ] use it.
TURTLE
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With stranded wire, solder creates a discontinuity in the flexibility of the wire - it's stiff where the solder has wicked, and flexible beyond that point. So, it's a potential failure, unless there's strain relief behind the joint.
George
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