Solid Fuses: Visible Indicator If Blown?

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It's been an electrifying thread. And I've learned so much from it.
--
Tegger

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On 9/25/2013 8:00 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

The NEC used to have correction tables for skin effect. Consistent with what you wrote, there was only a correction for large wire. I assume the correction is now included in the ampacity tables.

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I'm not worried. I think the other person and I are just busting chops. No harm done, I hope.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/25/2013 9:31 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

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On 9/24/2013 6:30 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Yeabut his error is not a bad as top posting.
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On 09/22/2013 07:35 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Not amperes, current (or amperage if you insist). 'amperes' are units of measurement, and don't acutually exist in the wire.
[snip]
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On 9/22/13 6:02 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Your work life is more complicated than mine. I don't have to worry about shutting down either wrong or interconnected stuff. Most importantly, I won't shut down the computer used to issue my pay check.
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On 9/22/2013 7:23 AM, Dean Hoffman > wrote:

That could cause a serious GRONK! if it's up and running when you killed the power. It's a bad idea to pull a big fuse out of an energized panel unless it's in a safety switch which won't open while turned on but the incoming line can be hot so there is still a bit of danger but if the safety switch is wired correctly there won't be any voltage on the fuses so yank away. Oh yea, trust no one, always check to make sure there is NO voltage. I've worked on industrial, commercial, government and residential electrical systems that had high, medium and low voltage power. I'm still here because I never became complacent around electricity. I'll never forget the time my brother was burned while working on a tractor. His metal watch band shorted to ground on the tractor's 6 volt starter and lit up. If I wear a watch it's always plastic. Never, ever believe that low voltage can't hurt you. ^_^
TDD
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That happened to my dad back in the '70s on his 1970 Ford. Somehow he managed to short the terminals on the car's 12V battery using a wrench and his metal watch band; there was a large spark, a loud snap, and the watch flew onto the driveway. I was watching when this happened.
There was a small, melted hole in the clasp of the band. The spark also melted and broke one of the pins that held the band to the clasp, which is why the band came apart. I think it was my dad's physical reaction to the shock that caused the watch to fly off his wrist and onto the driveway; I'm not sure it would have done that just from the spark alone.
--
Tegger

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On 9/24/2013 7:16 PM, Tegger wrote:

My brother was wearing one of those fancy Twist-O-Flex metal watchbands which turned it into a heater element. I remember the TV commercials for them from so many years ago. ^_^
TDD
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Im afraid I get the lead star, 'cause I don't know.

I'm all ears.
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Tegger

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I figure one would be volts, measure the voltage drop across the fuse. Open fuse, would show line voltage. Active fuse would show a voltage drop of 1 or 2.
Ammeter might show current flow through the fuse. Open fuse would read zero amps.
If the circuit is turned off, tagged and locked, the ohms scale can be used, maybe. Depending on some of the other circuits and wires involved.
And by now, I've had to replace three meters cause I'm all wrong. Let out the little white smoke from my meters.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/21/2013 10:20 PM, Tegger wrote:

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I might have missed it. But, what ARE the three settings? Did anyone win the gold star?

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On 9/24/2013 8:56 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Volts, Amps and Ohms. Of course for high currents it's the clamp on ammeter but lower current that won't melt your test leads it's through the DMM. An appliance that draws 2.5 amps and has a 3 amp fuse that's blown, you can measure the current by putting your test leads across the blown 3 amp fuse and if you see a 5 amp reading, you know there is a problem in the circuit. I have some small resettable circuit breakers with alligator clip test leads attached that I use for checking low current circuits which will help prevent the loss of the magic smoke which is contained in all electrical and electronic devices. Very high voltage is something you must treat with a lot more respect since it can hunt your happy butt down through many more paths. ^_^
TDD
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Now, that's totally helpful. Years ago, American Science And Surplus, or maybe it was Fair Radio. Someone had 5 amp circuit breakers before the Popper came into play.
One time I went to the parts house, and asked on behalf of my boss, for a five pack of 5 amp fuses. The computer said that pack cost $20.40, so I handed them back. Bought some at the auto parts.
Amping across blown fuse, that's clever.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/24/2013 2:06 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

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On Tue, 24 Sep 2013 16:27:07 -0400, Stormin Mormon

But amping across the blown fuse tells you no more about the FUSE than using a Voltmeter. It MAY tell you why the fuse blew. A simple neon circuit tester works just as good, fits in your shirt pocket. (doesn't work for low voltage circuits though)

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Helps determine why the fuse blew. Hmm. I guess you noticed what TDD was saying, and reflect back that information. Carry on.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/24/2013 4:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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I guess you missed the shift. TDD changed the subject, and gave us some more infor- mation on how to do electrical testing.
BTW, thank you, TDD, that's very helpful and thoughtful.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/24/2013 4:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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Not a good idea to put an ampmeter test probes across a fuse. Chances are that if the fuse blew the current draw is much higher than the fuse is rated for. The inexpensive meters could blow in your face. The beter ones will blow their internal fuse.
If something past the fuse opens up the fuse could be good but no current would pass. If there is no power going to the fuse, you still do not know if the fuse is good or bad. Not many ampmeters will take going from the load side of the fuse to the return power wire. If they do, the fuse will most likely blow.
The ampmeter clamped across a wire is only a good test to tell that the fuse is good for sure, but not if it is bad.
The voltmeter test will tell if you have power, if so then you can go across the fuse and from the load side of the fuse to the other power wire. This will tell you if the fuse is good, bad, or no power. But not if the fuse is good or bad if you do not have any power.
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On 9/24/2013 6:03 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I only put the ammeter across a load that won't damage the meter, I did mention that first. The shunt in my meter is good for 20 amps and I certainly wouldn't put it across a circuit that would exceed the safety limits of the meter. That's why I only do it for low current loads. The little circuit breakers with test leads help narrow down a problem with an overload while saving fuses at the same time. I may be assuming that others know enough not to do anything unsafe but I don't want to appear patronizing. I'm only giving general information from my own experience and I hope no one believes the same procedures work with dangerous high voltages and currents. ^_^
TDD
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With your luck, a whole load of spirits will come back from the other side, to tell you how they followed your advice and had their meters blow up in their faced, and now they are dead. Just can't win some times.
Anyhow, I did learn a bit, and thank you for that.
. The Ghost Of Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus (from the other side) www.lds.org .
On 9/25/2013 12:03 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

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