Solenoid Valve for Water Main

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wrote:

Our '52 Hudson had both mechanical brakes and hydraulic brakes. At least my older brother told me that. It might have had one on two wheels and both on the other two. I wish I had looked.

As someone whose brakes have failed 6 or 7 times, I do like dual brakes. I think on 3 separate cars the flexible brake line to a front wheel failed. Fortunately I was going slow and though I hit something each time, no real damage. Once I was stopped by an old chain link fence leaning against a lot of bushes.
Power to the brakes also failed twice because the plastic tube, 1/2 inch, right angle, right at the brake booster at the hose from the carb, popped off its cap. Once for my '65 and once fcr my '67 Pontiac. Both times were the first times I drove the car, not counting driving it home after acquiring it! Once after my brother drove 60 miles to the Philly airport to go to Viet Nam, lent me his car for a year, and I drove it home. The brake vacuum failed the first thing the next day. On the '67, the part failed the morning after I bought the car. Is that eerie or what? Dual brakes would not have helped in these cases. I don't think I hit anything these two times.
Also on my mother's '58 Ford Fairline 500, the metal brake line broke, right in front of the left rear wheel. When it was taken to the shop, she was told it failed because it needed linings, but that's not at all true, is it? That time, when the brakes didn't work, and there was a car turning left in front of me, I reached for the hand brake, and opened the hood. Then to separate the cars, I put the car in reverse, forgetting that it couldn't stop. But that time, I actually grabbed the hand brake and stopped it within 10 feet. That was good because the car was crooked now, and instead of staying in the left lane, I was backing into the right lane, on the main street in town. Fortunately, in Indianapolis, even the main street is quiet. 7PM on a Sunday at 28th st on Meridian St. So there was no one there to hit me a second time. :)
I think once I've had a failure since I've had dual brakes. The light went on, I conclused the master cylinder was bad. I replaced it and things were fine, and I didn't crash into anything. Much better than the other 6 or 7 times.

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put solenoid on ball valve, quick pretty easy solution.
hot water tanks are a common leak point, if thats the concern make sure the tanks area has drainage to a safe spot.
there are also rotary motor valves, to open and shut balves. a buddy has one in his car its used to turn off and on natural gas which powers his vehicles.
one must be careful to not make something so complex it fails more often.
the one shot solenoid, preferably using 2 solenoids on a ball valve is probably the ideal solution.
water companies use electric valves thats another probably pricey solution.
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What would cause a pipe to break?
Freezing?
In that case, if you also have alarm monitoring, have you considered installing a thermometer that will cause your burglar alarm to notifiy your monitoring company when it gets cold inside?
That way, you might catch it when it is approaching freezing, but before it freezes or breaks.
What kind of heat do you have? With some kinds, there are ways for the burglar alarm to know if the heat has failed, so you can notify the monitoring company even before it gets cold in the house, the first time the heating fails, especially if it requires manual reset, which will not be possible if no one is home.
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