Soldering soft copper

I am running a gas line out to my garage, however the run is about 120feet so I'll need to use a couple of rolls. I am using type L soft copper tubing. Is it okay to solder joints in a gas supply line or should I use flared fittings?
thanks
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rud wrote:

Hi, Flared fittings. How about length of yellow flexible hose kind? Tony
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Hi Tony, hope you are having a nice day
On 19-Nov-04 At About 10:58:11, Tony Hwang wrote to All Subject: Re: Soldering soft copper
TH> rud wrote:
>> I am running a gas line out to my garage, however the run is about >> 120feet so I'll need to use a couple of rolls. I am using type L soft >> copper tubing. Is it okay to solder joints in a gas supply line or >> should I use flared fittings? thanks
TH> Hi, Flared fittings. How about length of yellow flexible hose kind? TH> Tony
You need to attend a day long course to buy this stuff and last I knew it was fo contractors only.
-=> HvacTech2 <=-
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Is this an approved method in your area? It is not an approved method where I live. If I was putting gas underground (assumed) I would be using the pvc coated grc made exactly for this. Have fun, see ya on the news
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Around here they require K. Some codes forbid all copper. Check on it first. Codes generally insist on flared, though I have no idea why. (Anyone know?)
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This is Turtle
Plumbers are very poor welders and are use to playing with their nuts and Flare nuts. Just turning a Nut is eazy but welding solider joint is not. Less Leaks with Nuts on the job.
TURTLE
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This is Turtle.
Check your code in your area as to Copper or L or K types of copper being used. I personally don't have a problem with L copper for this but i would feel safer with K on it.
To weld / sweat or not. Depends on how good you are and do you have the right tools to sweat it right. Also check you code out as to what they perfer.
TURTLE
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For gas lines, soldering the copper lines is something not really want to do. Even if new and no gas present, making repairs once the gas is turned on is somehting you do not want to use any heat with. Even after the gas has been turned off can have a pocket of gas still in the line.
Use the flare nuts!

used.
safer
right
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This is Turtle.
I can tell you right now he does not have the right tools to sweat the copper in with for it would cost about a couple thousand dollars to buy the tools. The gas companys use welding or screw pipe on all their lines for they have the tools to do it right by welding. The Flare nuts & Screw pipe is for Do it yourselfers and plumber making tie in's or additions.
With the right tools you can purgue the lines with N2 and sweat / weld the joint that needs fixing. He ask this question just about already knowing he will have to use flare nuts or screw pipe.
Wait a minute here. I could be wrong here for there is some people in this world that does not have a clue and will attemp sweating and not know what they are doing. I think that is the ones I read about in the New paper.
I take everything back here.
TURTLE
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[original post is likely clipped to save bandwidth] On 19 Nov 2004 07:48:09 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (rud) wrote:

Check code!
Around my area (local codes):
1 - you must be a licensed gas fitter, skip that and your home fire insurance goes up in smoke
2 - soldering/welding/brazing gas lines of any type is forbidden on premises.
3 - all NEW natural gas and propane underground runs MUST now be plastic.
gerry
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With (I hope) running a metallic wire along with it, so that it can be found by the metal detectors used to find buried pipe.
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rud wrote:

Not a good idea to use copper for this. Natural gas reacts with copper and causes it to flake off and clogs the orifices of the device using the gas. Typical underground gas pipe is coated black iron or special plastic piping that requires special tools and training to use them (as well as certification) Also note that the transition from under ground to above ground with plastic should be as special metal riser to protect the pipe from damage. Typical codes require metal pipe be buried no less than 12" and plastic 18".
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[original post is likely clipped to save bandwidth]
wrote:

Note, for NG copper use, code here required plated (interior of tube) copper tubing. That pretty much ruled out any soldering, brazing or welding.
Now, only plastic may be used underground HERE. Propane or NG.
gerry
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Wow, quite the responses and ranges. Now it gets more intersting. my city building inspector said that only type K or L copper can be used, and all joints that are to be hidden must be brazed, not flared.
Line must also hold 60psi for 1hr or 25lbs for 12hrs.

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