Soldering Galvinized Gutter

I need to replace a section of my galvinized roof gutter. I was told that the best way to join the galvinized gutter sections is to solder the pieces together. I have soldered copper pipe a lot in the past, but never galvinized steel. Is the process essentially the same as pipe? Do I need to use flux (spelling) and do I use the same type of solder?
Thanks in advance for any responses.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes to all of the questions.
Here are a few disclaimers: Tinners use large, heavy soldering irons, not torches. Tinners use bar solder - same stuff, just allows larger quantity quicker. Tinners usually use liquid flux with a brush.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And stay upwind of it, because zink fumes can make you pretty sick, in the short term.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob wrote:

One difference between copper pipe and gutter is that the gutter is often in contact with a wood surface (fascia board) and in close proximity to asphalt (or even wood) shingles. So the fire hazard is more of a concern if you are working with a torch. If that's a concern for you, you might consider alternatives such as outdoor caulk or epoxy. My aluminum gutters are caulked at the seams and have been fine for the last 10 years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob wrote:

Sheet material is thin so the temp changes quickly and is more difficult for someone who hasn't done it before. In addition, thin material like gutters is likely to distort considerably with the heat. You need a liquid flux (acid flux) and paint in on with a brush. Don't know what type of solder you used in the past. I use the old standard lead solder (60/40 or whatever) solid for metals, resin core for electrical stuff.
Personally, I would join the sections with an appropriate sealer of some sort (I would probably silicone caulk for gutters and flashing. But if you have enough sections and you are a faster learner, you may be pretty good at soldering them by the time you finish.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.