Soldering directly to button battery

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On Fri, 27 Aug 2010 01:41:54 +0100, Grimly Curmudgeon

hardly find AAA batteries for devices they took with them. Might be different today. AAA batteries were virtually unobtanium in Zambia, and not much better in Burkina Faso. AA was common - D was everywhere. In Britland they had there own "torch" batteries that we never, or seldom, see for sale in Canada or the US.
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wrote:

That only proves that places lke zambia, portugal, or god help you france don't really exist.
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the drugs began to take hold. I remember snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca saying something like:

They've been absolutely common here for many years, but again, the French market might have been different.

Back of beyond, not surprising.

Oh yes, there were some oddball sizes for 6V lanterns, cycle lamps, and the like.
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Cobblers. Or rather, your friends couldn't have tried too hard. I've been able to buy AAA batteries across Europe (Germany, Belgium, France, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, Portugal) for at least the last 30 years. In supermarkets, garages, tobacconists and hardware shops. And of course your new claim that "friends" could "hardly find" AAA batteries 10 to 15 years ago is hardly relevant to today or to your stupid claim that "AAA batteries are almost unheard of in Europe and Africa".
Try not talking shit and people might just stop laughing at you. Until then, put down the shovel and step away from the hole.
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AZ Nomad wrote: (snip)

to load Ubuntu on them, and put them on the swap board at work for 30 bucks or so, as 'emergency backup e-mail terminals, for when you can't get the kids off the real computer.' Perfectly adequate for that, or for use as typewriters for simple word processing. Haven't checked lately to see if they remember the date, but I have fired up computers stored for 3-4 years before, and they came right up and said hello.
--
aem sends...

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Fuck it. I get P4 class machines for nothing from people who can't run windows on them any more. Have a pentium-m laptop as a firewall and a P4 Dell as an asterisk based home PBX. Total cost for both machines? Zero.
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This RISC OS RPC is 1996, and still on the original battery. It's only powered up when in use - so no more than a couple of hours a day on average. And survived my last holiday. But I really should change the battery as a precaution.
--
*Never kick a cow pat on a hot day *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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OP didn't mention that. I did. And only in relation to permanently-affixed CMOS batteries, which were only brought up as an example. I had mistakenly believed that the leads on such batteries were soldered to the battery, but have since been corrected.
--
Tegger

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I agree. They're less than five bucks each, full-retail. And their voltage is correct for the equipment in question.
--
Tegger

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Not a good idea to leave any flat battery in place. Just about any type can leak. Also, it may try and re-charge off the new ones so drawing more current than necessary.
--
*I'm really easy to get along with once people learn to worship me

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 8/24/2010 5:53 AM, john hamilton wrote:

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I did this with a small clock mechanism. The button batteries were going out too fast. I just soldered to the original tabs though.
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There are warnings about charging lithiums and having them explode. I have never heard of it happening and have seen applications where they were being charged and nothing happened. (they must be very toxic-you need a label when shipping them)
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Bob Villa wrote:

and have seen applications where they

They are not toxic, but they can pop nicely and start decent fires when shorted.
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Li polymer batteries are worse, but you can find exploding button cells on Youtube if you look:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=te3oRB9rv8E
In the comments, someone said they had one explode whilst soldering it.
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Andrew Gabriel
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wrote:

I've soldered to batteries many times. Heat a spot on the battery, leaeve a blob of solder. Tin the wire with solder. Reheat blob on battery, stick wire in blob, remove iron, hold very still while it cools.
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On Tue, 24 Aug 2010 10:53:14 +0100, john hamilton wrote:

Yes, they can go bang when soldering if you apply too much heat for too long. Applying power to one probably isn't a good idea, either (you'd basically be trying to recharge an no-rechargeable cell - I doubt it'd outright explode or catch fire, but it might leak, and ever the vapours from batteries can make a real mess of PCB traces).
Personally I'd desolder it - preferably cutting it from the PCB first and then desoldering the legs that remain. What the device is would dictate whether I'd fit a direct replacement, or a socket, or trailing wires to a socket, or trailing wires to a holder to take AAAs etc.
cheers
Jules
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john hamilton wrote:

make a dummy battery. A disk of double sided ecb material will work. solder to the copper, shim for thickness. Don't have a disk? use a nickel and a dime with insulation between. Depending on the socket, you may have to build up the diameter a little with solder.
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fuck it. Just buy a few batteries.
I've never soldered to a button cell, but had no trouble with flashlight batteries.
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Thanks to all. Mike's suggestion of just finding disc/washer the same size at the battery is a good simple solution. why didn't i think of that? Removes the need to be worrying about leaking or explosions.
The reason to replace the button battery with a couple of AAA batteries in a holder, is that the battery powers a very small Laser beam. It really eats the batteries. My understanding is that if I use two rechargable batteries and they are in series I'm going to get about 2.4 V total instead of the 3.4 V of the button battery. Am I right in thinking that this lower voltage will not do any damage to the Laser light mechanism? If it is a bit dimmer as a result, I dont mind.
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