Soldering Copper Pipes

Well, I have just completed my first job, installing soldered shutoffs in two water lines lines so that I can renovate my powder room. I had no leaks when I turned the water back on. My question is this, if it is holding now, how confident could I feel about the job?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Done properly it should last forever. It is extremely rare that a fitting will break or leak after time, but I've seen it happen, both in industrial settings. .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have found that some of the fluxes for the new lead-free solders can give a delayed reaction. I had several tight joints that did NOT leak for two days, and then started dripping even one with a two foot squirt that erupted on the third day. I think the flux burned in the joint and hardened when it cooled down but water pressure finally pushed out the thick flux over a few days resulting in a leak.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

keep an eye on it for the next while.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you want to get an idea of how good your technique is, after it has cooled and even been used (remove the water of course) heat and pull apart a joint, and look at the surfaces to see how well your solder covers them. Shake off the hot solder first. Since I take apart a lot of old fittings, I've seen a few bad joints, but even in those cases there is usually enough solder around the pipe so they never leaked. After a while and with proper cleaning and fluxing, one learns to recognize the solder drawing into the joint all around it and get consistently good joints. --Phil
EXT wrote:

--
Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@cc.ysu.edu Youngstown State University
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
From my experience soldering not only plumbing, but copper piping in vacuum systems is that if the surfaces were well cleaned and fluxed and if the solder flows quickly on its own around and into the joint it won't leak and I assume never pop apart. Key is practice and applying the heat so all surfaces are just above the melting point of the solder. Over heating can also cause problems. A lot of this is experience and having feel for it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 31 Jul 2006 13:29:39 -0400, "Ultraglide"

I soldered 91 joints when I renovated my bathroom three years ago and it was my first time to do it. None leaked initially or since then. I was meticulous about cleaning the pipe and fittings before I soldered. Think you'll be ok if you are careful.
Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.