Solder or crimp ??

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On 12/30/2013 7:56 PM, philo wrote:

From what you write, there continues to be definite need. Perhaps that would be a retirement income for you, and save the life of some future tech? Sell thick plastic snap on covers for battery bank bus bars.
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my van had a problem with the resistor pack for the blower speed control. the connections would overheat and get flakey. after several failures i soldered the wires to the resistor bank connections.
no more troubles this repair outlasted the van
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wrote:

and the Mystique. Due to crappy connectors, not due to crimped connectors.
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for high current crip connections life depends on the type of terminal used...
copper ring terminals using screw to the whatever like a switch , is much better than steel or alunimum spade slide on connectors.....
the poorer the connection causes resistance which heats the connection, which increase the resistance and before you know it the wole mess overheats and the connection opens. a little smoke gets lots of attention.
this occurs all the time on the machines i service for a living. I carry a roll of 14 gauge wire for splicing, and keep some 12 gauge for selected locations
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wrote:

I've addressed this over and over...Crimp is better than solder:
Years ago when I was involved in the security industry, I worked with alarm installers who pulled wire, made connections, and HAD the years of experience of PRACTICAL installs. They made the comment to me that crimp is the BEST connection, and solder will tend to fail, and definitely NEVER solder a crimp connection because it loses its 'goodness'.
Sadly, being an arrogant youth and being skilled at soldering, having a degree from Stanford, and jsut generally knowing 'I' knew better; I didn't listen. So, when I installed my security system in my home, I, of course, soldered the connections. I wrapped wires a good one inch with at least 5 twists and flowed the solder on beautifully - classic high qaulity workmanship. Ten years later, a false alarm, reset no problem. month later another false alarm, reset too, and more and more often until once a week a false alarm. I went around and resoldered all my connections and guess what no more false alarms for you guessed it another ten years. ...From this experience, I learned a lot of respect for people who may not have degrees, but have to do the work everyday, and learn from THEIR experiences.
Also, look at the phone company. they don't solder, they also use mechanical pressure to maintain contact. After all, that is ALL soldering does. It maintains some semblance of 'sealing' and mechanically constraining the connection you made by simply twisting two wires together.
CONCLUSION: *IF* you want a reliable connection to last for years, CRIMP!!! and follow the directions.
Plus, and this can get really, really bad. If your soldered connection is passing power and starts to fail, you guessed it!, it will unsolder itself for you! Seen that, too.
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In the mean time, I'll fix bad crimps by soldering.
Greg
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Didn't know we were comparing bad crimps to bad soldering. Yes, as my example showed, soldering works very well ...for a while.
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On Mon, 30 Dec 2013 23:41:05 -0700, RobertMacy

+1
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On 12/31/2013 12:19 AM, gregz wrote:

Why not good crimps? :-)
As an aside. Some terminals will have their listing voided if soldered. The air flow in the terminal is part of the cooling allowing for the rated ampacity. These terminals are usually aluminum or a crappy alloy. If possible, always get terminals rated for 90 degree C.
People who find faulty crimps usually found someone who used the wrong tool for the job. Those crappy wire stripper/crimper all in one tools with the crimp section toward the handle are pure junk. I prefer, as an all in one, a dedicated multi crimper from Klein. Long handles and you can really bear down on the terminal. Forward section is multi-gauge for insulated, and the rear section is for multi-gauge non-insulated.
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