Solder or crimp ??

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On Sun, 29 Dec 2013 17:34:15 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Not hardly. Cat crimps and solders wire terminations, as you mentioned, on circuit boards, as well in as but splices, ring terminals and similar, military connectors, ITT Cannon (Sure Seal) connectors and a few others.
They only crimp terminations in all Deutsch connectors and some other lesser used connectors.
Due to the quantity of wires in the Deutsch connectors versus all the other terminations approx. 60% are crimped only and 40% are crimped and soldered.
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On Sun, 29 Dec 2013 08:35:37 -0600, Gordon Shumway

specialist. Original wiring harnesses are crimped.
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On Sun, 29 Dec 2013 17:32:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Tell your future son-in-law to look at the engineering spec for soldering that is listed on all harness drawings. If that contradicts anything I've said I owe you a beer. If not, you owe me a beer. Deal?
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Again, depends on the application. I jes replaced all the battery cables on my 6V golf cart. Severe corrosion where the stranded heavy gage cables crimp into the battery lugs necessitated it. The new one's are the same thing, so will probably encounter the same problem eventually. I suspect this construction is more about economy than effectiveness. Why waste money on solder when crimp will do, in the short term. I helped one lady with a bad golf cart cable. She was trying to crimp on a new lug, but had no proper crimper. I soldered it.
nb
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On 12/29/2013 11:14 AM, notbob wrote:

Back in the old days it was common to grease such connections... no harm in carrying on that old tradition or spraying with anti-corrosion compound.
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Yeah. I always carry a can in my back pocket. 8|
nb
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terminal, and a roll of solder - - - - -
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I had a roll of solder and Bernz torch back at the house. Fresh outta anti-corrosion spray. Besides, the real problem was lack of crimpers. All she had was a pair of channel locks. I also didn't have a crimper large enough. The solder worked fine.
nb
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On 12/29/2013 6:17 PM, notbob wrote:

I've done crimps with hammer and anvil, on occasion.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 12/28/2013 11:06 PM, Larry W wrote:

apart and the soldered connector pins always had heat-shrink tubing on them as a strain relief but the wiring harnesses were always designed so wires were not pulled at a 90° angle. ^_^
TDD
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On Sun, 29 Dec 2013 05:06:53 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lonestar.org (Larry W) wrote:

Depending on what's needed, crimping is almost always going to be faster and cheaper for a great many applications and will be "good enough" for the life needed.
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You are suggesting that soldering, although more time consuming and expensive, would be better for longer-life applications.
Back in the early 60s, I worked with an engineer that needed to determine which type of connection would be best for use in a high-reliability military system.
Half of several connector sets were soldered, half were crimped. This included using smaller gauge wire in some pins, folding the wire for crimping.
My job was to monitor the testing, which included vibration, shock, temperature cycling, humidity cycling and salt spray.
As I recall, there were numerous failures of the soldered connections. The only crimp failures were where smaller gauge wire was used.
Fred
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wrote:

I said "depending on what's needed". I made no claim that soldering was always better nor that crimping was always better, only that crimping is faster and IF conditions are such that crimping will last the design life it's likely that manufacturers will crimp rather then solder. Same as why production electricians will shove the wires into the spring clip holes on home electrical outlets instead of taking the time to wrap the wire dinner the screw and tighten it. Same reason many things are pop-riveted instead of brazed, and on and on.
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On Sat, 28 Dec 2013 19:08:06 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Despite the agreement from posters in general, line by line, the url reads like a satire to me.

20 years ago I bought a selection of crimp connectors from J.C Whitney on sale for about 8 dollars. Maybe 18 different kinds and sizes totally 200 connectors For 8 dollars. 4 cents a piece.
Came with a crimping tool, which I use,
Am I to believe that the quality of the connectors is sufficient to make a crimp? With cheap connectors, soldering sounds better to me.
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wrote:

The key word in "proper crimp" is "proper". If you can't guarantee that, solder is good but it will cause other problems. If you're worried about the connection (or if a fault may cause damage or the possible loss of life), dump the crappy connectors and crimper and do it right.
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wrote:

kit) you will get an adequate connection with a little care. With a cheap-assed tool it takes a bit more care, but it is still possible.
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A good crimp is good. How do you verify a good crimp ? Made with proper tool ? Questionable in bad environments too. I've fixed far too many crimps by soldering.
Greg
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On 12/28/2013 06:08 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

As I may have mentioned I just retired from Enersys-Delaware which is a major manufacturer of industrial batteries and I was in close contact with the engineers at Anderson as we used their connectors exclusively.
Crimping is preferred to soldering. Just make sure you get a good crimp. Most of their contacts require two crimps.
Soldering is acceptable but you must absolutely insure you do not splash any solder on the mating portion of the contacts. Since the contact are silver plated, solder will degrade the connection.
Link here:
http://www.powerwerx.com/assembly.asp
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On 12/29/2013 8:42 AM, philo wrote:

No fair quoting the actual company! We can only vaguely argue, here.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 12/29/2013 08:43 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Just because Anderson (who makes the connectors) gives specific instructions does not mean anyone has to follow them. <G>
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