soil under driveway eroded away

The soil under my concrete driveway has eroded away at one portion. The driveway is now forming a concrete bridge over air.
How can I resolve this? The only thing I can think of is calling a mudjacking company to pump in more concrete.
- Jesse snipped-for-privacy@cfl.roadrunner.com replace 'roadrunner' with 'rr' to reply.
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On 9/17/13 8:08 AM, Jesse wrote:

Fill sand?
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How would I compact it? Throwing loose sand under the driveway won't support the concrete slab.
"Dean Hoffman" wrote in message

Fill sand?
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On 9/17/13 8:52 AM, Jesse wrote:

Hmmm. You would have to ask that. Maybe a concrete compaction tool that looks like a long rod. I really don't know. Fill sand was the first thing that came to mind that would be relatively cheap. Supposedly one can set a fence post solidly with sand and some water.

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On Tue, 17 Sep 2013 20:09:46 -0500, Dean Hoffman

Use bentonite.
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Jesse wrote:

Hi, +1
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You hdd better fix your drainage problem. Where is the water coming from, and why is it eroding your driveway?

How big is the gap?
--
Tegger

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Tegger wrote:

Hi, Maybe he lives in recent flooded area?
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This isn't a binary group; please do not post pictures here.
Is your driveway standing proud of the surface all around like that? If so, that's the reason you're getting that erosion. I'll bet the problem is being caused by water running off the concrete and onto the soil, which appears not to have anything holding it in place. Fill the edges all the way to the top of the concrete, then put grass or other well-rooted vegetation to hold the soil in place.
--
Tegger

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"Tegger" wrote in message

Yes, it does. I had planned to reslope the driveway edges anyway but I didn't think that would have caused the problem. Thank you.
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Jesse wrote:

First, finds out why it is eroding. There might be an aquifer running under the driveway which will continue to erode whatever you put under there. Divert that source.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Tuesday, September 17, 2013 10:41:23 AM UTC-4, willshak wrote:

And how much? Pics?
If it's 6" from one side, I wouldn't call a mudjacking company. Hell, if it's so extensive that you'd call them, then I'd just fix it, pour a new driveway, or section of the driveway
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

It ain't me asking.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote in message

And how much? Pics?
If it's 6" from one side, I wouldn't call a mudjacking company. Hell, if it's so extensive that you'd call them, then I'd just fix it, pour a new driveway, or section of the driveway
The water table is just a couple feet underground. Its soggy whenever it rains. The builders brought in dirt and raised the driveway (and the house) about a foot and a half. I'm guessing they didn't tamp the driveway correctly before pouring and it settled.
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Jesse wrote:

Hi, Wow, that is major issue, alright. When I had my cabin built in a place called Seven Springs, I had to bury weeping tiles criss cross after digging for basement and brought in 30 dump truck load of gravel/coarse sand sub soil, waited for two years B4 I started building. After 14 years nothing bad happened.
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On Tuesday, September 17, 2013 11:50:38 AM UTC-4, Jesse wrote:

I find a 4x4 works pretty well for packing dirt into a spot that is a little hard to reach. Slam the end into it a bunch. Don't fill it all the way, do a few inches at a time.
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wrote:

When i lived in an indianapolis suburb, I was looking at the city map and finally noticed a stream that ran near my house, a stream I had never seen in person.. I walked 3 lots, 300 feet, to the south and couldn't exactly find a stream, but boy was their back yard wet. Probably the reason our crawlspace never dried out, and our back yard was soaking wet a month or two each year.
There were probably fish in their crawl space.
I never looked in their front yard.
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wrote:

Not the OP's question but if the stream was on the map, doesn't that mean it was probably a visible stream when the home builder got there? And rather than "waste" a lot, he just poured dirt into the stream until the stream disappeared, and then built the house, and sold it maybe in August when it hadn't rained for 2 months?
The land was flat, like most of central Indiana.

The crawlspace was short enough that even a 10-year old boy had to bend over to walk around. What is that, 3 feet?

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On 9/17/2013 8:08 AM, Jesse wrote:

I guess that it would depend on just how deep (far back) the erosion goes.
Mudjacking might be my first thought as well, but thinking somewhat outside the box, how about resolving the cause of the erosion and then, if you feel lucky, damn it up and mix up a load of self-leveling floor compound, a concrete type material.
Let's face it, the original concrete is going to protect it from the weather and that leveling compound goes down like a thin milk shake and sets up quickly. It should form an adequate bridge between the eart beneath the driveway slab and the slab itself.
Important though to cure the erosion problem else you're just kicking that can down the road and you'll be filling in somewhere else next year.
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