soil erosion behind wooden seawall on lake


hi all,
i have a seawall (i think it's wood though, at least the top / front portion is) on part of a canal that leads to a freshwater lake.
the soil is starting to erode. i'm worried eventually the seawall will collapse? or someone's foot go through it..
what can i do? what i thought about doing was digging about a 6 inch trench along the seawall, as low as i can go, and filling it with gravel... or even pouring some concrete in there?
trying to avoid a costly visit from a dock repair man if possible.
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check your property survey and see who actually owns it. check with your neighborhood association sometimes they pool the owners money to fix these all at once. if the thing is unique to your property and you own it, you are obligated to safely maintain it. there may be visual historic requirements for the repair as well. you need local information and expert advice. the problem could be as deep as the base of the seawall, or as simple as some topsoil.
kyle wrote:

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If seawall is on a public waterway; ask a local authority. Shore it up as they like.
Yes, shore the back of seawall up....rocks,,things to stand up to the constant water pounding,
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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kyle wrote:

We have a concrete (sections) seawall on a channel to the Gulf of Mexico. Had major repairs done about 5 years ago. One issue was whether the increased drainage would stop erosion. The contractor put pipes through the wall which have landscape fabric on the soil side to keep soil from washing through with the water. Works great. He told us that if water and soil continued to wash through the joints between the wall sections, to dig out behind them and place plywood wrapped in the landscape fabric down behind the joint. Fortunately, we haven't had to do that. The plywood was just the means to get the fabric in place and laid out flat. There is fabric available at masonry supply outlets, I believe. Not the same stuff used for lawns.
Our city has online databse of construction standards, including plans for seawalls. Not suitable for your area probably, but your locale might have the same. It would help to know what the area has and what depth, wave action, etc., you get. Local code here is very specific about what you can and cannot do, and not much that a homeowner can do himself.
If the wood is in good shape, and you have just lost some soil over time, you could probably throw in some ordinary landscape cloth, fill with soil and plant something that will help hold the soil in place.
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I can understand that, but are there any EPS restrictions? You certainly don't want a visit from them as it will be very costly if you do something wrong. Check to see if there are any regulations on the lake.
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