so how do I fix my broken window?

I noticed it was cold in the basement today, sure enough one of the basemen t windows was broken, both "storm" and inner window. The screen in between was okay.
I have no idea what happened. If it was a person, my dog would have gone n uts. She isn't that big but sounds like a rabid German shepherd, she even scares me. So maybe she scared somebody away, or maybe just a rock from a lawnmower.
The storm is just a light aluminum drop in and I can get it out. From expe rience I know to take these to an expert.
But the inner window is one of those with a latch on top and it pivots down about 20 degrees for ventilation. I don't know what you call those. It l ooks like the glass is puttied into it. I want to take it out to work on i t. I've done more putty work than I want to admit, because my Dad had the "you broke it you fix it" policy when we were kids.
Does anybody know how to get that kind of window out?
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There are probably simple leaf hinges on the bottom. You might consider just replacing the whole thing with a similar vinyl double-insulated window from home Depot. I think they're about $80 and come in a few sizes.
I noticed it was cold in the basement today, sure enough one of the basement windows was broken, both "storm" and inner window. The screen in between was okay.
I have no idea what happened. If it was a person, my dog would have gone nuts. She isn't that big but sounds like a rabid German shepherd, she even scares me. So maybe she scared somebody away, or maybe just a rock from a lawnmower.
The storm is just a light aluminum drop in and I can get it out. From experience I know to take these to an expert.
But the inner window is one of those with a latch on top and it pivots down about 20 degrees for ventilation. I don't know what you call those. It looks like the glass is puttied into it. I want to take it out to work on it. I've done more putty work than I want to admit, because my Dad had the "you broke it you fix it" policy when we were kids.
Does anybody know how to get that kind of window out?
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On 11/10/2014 5:53 PM, TimR wrote:

You have what is called a hopper window. You may have the type with the hinge on each side, check the hinges and see if it latches to a pin. If it does, it will be apparent how to remove. The hole on the arm is kinda oblong, move it to where it fits over the pin. Then it just drops/pulls out.
If it isn't designed as explained above, go to YouTube and search basement hopper window. There are several designs out there.
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On Monday, November 10, 2014 7:44:31 PM UTC-5, Norman wrote:

ement windows was broken, both "storm" and inner window. The screen in bet ween was okay.

ne nuts. She isn't that big but sounds like a rabid German shepherd, she e ven scares me. So maybe she scared somebody away, or maybe just a rock fro m a lawnmower.

experience I know to take these to an expert.

down about 20 degrees for ventilation. I don't know what you call those. It looks like the glass is puttied into it. I want to take it out to work on it. I've done more putty work than I want to admit, because my Dad had the "you broke it you fix it" policy when we were kids.

Thanks. I've never heard that term before. Knowing the right word is very helpful.
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On 11/10/2014 5:53 PM, TimR wrote:

If you're concerned about security, consider block windows.
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TimR:
A "Hopper" window is one that is hinged at the bottom and opens outward.
An "Awning" window is one that is hinged at the top and opens outward. Hopper windows aren't as popular because if you forget to close your windows before a rain or hail storm, you could have a puddle of water on the floor by the time you do it. Awning windows naturally prevent that by shedding water to the outside.
If your glass pane is held in place by putty, your first step is to remove the putty and then remove the glass pane.
Now, putty was popular decades ago before there were high quality caulks. So, what I tell people that are replacing panes in wooden windows that are held in place with putty is to:
1. remove the putty, 2. pull out the glazing points, 3. replace the glass, 4. push the glazing points back in and 5. Use a high quality caulk like Kop-R-Lastic instead of putty, and 6. Paint both the wood and the caulk once the caulk is fully cured.
Now, if these are PVC windows and it doesn't seem obvious to you what is holding the glass panes in, there will almost certainly be a PVC stop molding on the inside of the window frame, which when removed, will allow the glass to be removed. You will have to remove the window screen to access that stop molding, and the seam between the stop molding and the window frame will be so thin as to make you wonder if it actually is a stop molding or a very thin line in the window frame itself. You need a special pry bar to pry that kind of stop molding out. These special pry bars are sold in hardware stores and are typically called called "scraper/lever bar" because their edge is very thin and can be used for scraping, and the tool is made of high carbon steel so it's very strong and works well as a lever too:
http://tinyurl.com/logp23v
The tool shown in the above link is what you need to remove the stop moldings from modern windows. It's chisel end is sharp enough to fit in the very thin seam between the window frame and the window stop molding. These "scraper/lever bars" can be bought any any hardware store or home center for a few dollars.
--
nestork


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On Monday, November 10, 2014 11:17:17 PM UTC-5, nestork wrote:

This window is clearly steel. So I'm not sure how it's held in place but probably no glazier points. It looks like a wedge of putty but it's suspiciously even and smooth. I'll see more when I get it out. It has been painted, fairly sloppily.
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On Tuesday, November 11, 2014 8:19:47 AM UTC-5, TimR wrote:

probably no glazier points. It looks like a wedge of putty but it's suspi ciously even and smooth. I'll see more when I get it out. It has been pai nted, fairly sloppily.
I replaced glass in a couple of steel-frame windows many years ago. My memo ry is a bit fuzzy, but I recall that the frames had channels in them. There were spring clips that fit into the channels to hold the glass tight with their tension, after which I puttied over the clips. If you remove the putt y on your windows, you will probably find the spring clips buried within.
Paul
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The hopper window, that hinges on the bottom and opens inwardly, should hav e some sort of "stop mechanism" on each side that keeps the window from fal ling inwardly all the way. Look for some sort of keyhole slots that will a llow the window to become "free" so you can tilt it sideways and get the bo ttom pins out of the bottom slot. Than get out your chisel and remove the putty,etc,a drill apparently you know all too well<g>.
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As Pavel314 said, the glass will be held in with clips. Unfortunately, the clips are likely to be rusted away and not reusable. They may also get damaged in the process of removing the glass. You may have to improvise to hold the new glass in.
I don't know why nestork recommends caulking. I still use glazing compound on all windows. But you can't paint it with water-base paint for awhile. This time of year you could just leave it for Spring. Then prime with good oil primer before painting. (I also prime the surface before puttying, with oil proimer or linseed oil, to provide a bond and also to prevent leaching of oil from the putty into the wood in the case of wood windows. If it's not primed the glazing is likely to fail and/or come loose.)
| On Monday, November 10, 2014 11:17:17 PM UTC-5, nestork wrote: | | > Now, putty was popular decades ago before there were high quality | > caulks. So, what I tell people that are replacing panes in wooden | > windows that are held in place with putty is to: | > 1. remove the putty, | > 2. pull out the glazing points, | > 3. replace the glass, | > 4. push the glazing points back in and | > 5. Use a high quality caulk like Kop-R-Lastic instead of putty, and | > 6. Paint both the wood and the caulk once the caulk is fully cured. | | This window is clearly steel. So I'm not sure how it's held in place but probably no glazier points. It looks like a wedge of putty but it's suspiciously even and smooth. I'll see more when I get it out. It has been painted, fairly sloppily.
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thanks all for the help.
Knowing how a hopper window works now, it wasn't that hard to get it out.
I took the storm window in to a local repair shop because there's a real art to getting those aluminum channels off and on again. They aren't built to come apart, they are staked together. Since I was going there anyway, I brought the steel window too.
It is not easy to find someone who will repair those aluminum channel windows. None of the local big box stores nor the specialty hardware stores could touch it. When this guy retires we'll all be buying new windows, or maybe lots of duct tape.
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On Tuesday, November 11, 2014 3:12:57 PM UTC-5, TimR wrote:

art to getting those aluminum channels off and on again. They aren't built to come apart, they are staked together. Since I was going there anyway, I brought the steel window too.
Update: the windows are fixed. He charged $25 labor plus the cost of the glass. He said it took more than an hour to get the putty off the steel wi ndow, the torch didn't do much. Sounds like I made the right decision lett ing this one go to the expert.
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Update: the windows are fixed. He charged $25 labor plus the cost of the glass. He said it took more than an hour to get the putty off the steel window, the torch didn't do much. Sounds like I made the right decision letting this one go to the expert.

Indeed. At less than $25/hour he must be working for the fun of it. I've glazed those windows occasionally in the past and never found a good replacement for the clips that hold the glass in, so you probably saved yourself an afternoon of unsatisfying hassle for $25.
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