Snow shovels

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On Tue, 28 Dec 2010 19:19:45 -0600, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Again, because you've never tried it you say "waste time". I, and many others in snow country, would never buy anything else.
Don't bother replying.
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On Tue, 28 Dec 2010 22:55:45 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Of course, you're wrong as always. I lived in "snow country" all my life.

Then why to you post, stupid?
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On Tue, 28 Dec 2010 23:34:37 -0600, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

anyone else is welcome to reply, but I knew what you were going to say (and I was right).
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?

Sure, and I've also noticed that people don't dig holes in dirt with snow shovels. Different tools for different uses.
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wrote:

And the plastic ones with no strip last me 3. I won't buy snow-pushers with a metal edge any more - particularly with my interlocking stone driveway.
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George wrote:

Thanks for your observations - I'll certainly bear them in mind.
It's 72 degrees in Houston; it may be awhile.
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It looks like that would be a good shovel to push snow. I wouldn't have one for *lifting* snow.

I had a couple of those (they don't last forever). They are *great* for lifting snow, like the crap the snowplow leaves at the end of the driveway. The bent handle makes using your legs to lift/throw more natural. They really are back savers. As noted above, the only drawback of these is the aluminum blade is rather flimsy. They really have to be to make them as light as possible (saving the back more). OTOH, ice will ruin the blade.
Ames is also a very good company. Not that you'll need it with a snow shovel, but I found their customer service to be superb.
Of course, the best solution is to move far enough South that any snow is self-shoveling. ;-)
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wrote:

I picked up a similar one at a True Value store last week. I actually felt pretty good in my hands. I'm pretty happy with my 24" pusher with a straight wooden handle. It takes care of 3" quite well. Over that and I reach for a snowblower.

It seems to be an interesting compromise between a pusher and a lifter-- not sure how that would work in practice.

I've got one of those in the shed with just enough scratches on it to show that I tried. I never got used to it. I don't lift much snow, though-- and I'm an old fart and resistant to change.
Jim
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wrote:

I won't buy anything EXCEPT plastic blade snow shovels anymore, and the "bent" handles really do help the back. I like 24 inch or wider, but then I only use the shovel when the snowfall is a couple inches at a time - heavier snowfalls warrant getting the blower out.
Then again, when it gets REALLY sloppy, the blower just plugs up, so it's out with the shovel. Sometimes I really wish I had a narrower one, but that's not very often compared to when the wide one is nice.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: -snip-

That's when I pull out the single stage electric. [an old Toro 12amp] It will empty mud puddles, and shoots thick-shake consistency snow 20-30'.
Jim
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wrote:

I piched one of those up this fall too. Works pretty good for a small accumulation of wet snow on the driveway, but on a 60X120 corner lot it takes a lot of cord to do the sidewalk, and with basically a thraight throw pattern it's a lot of work to do a 20X40 driveway and the "apron" on the boulevard.
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On Wed, 29 Dec 2010 23:32:20 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That must be what I would call an electric shovel. [and who knows what it is supposed to be called<g>] My electric blower is 18" wide & has a chute that adjusts from left to right-- or if you want to throw the snow 40, feet- straight ahead.
Jim
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On 12/28/2010 03:15 PM, Rebel1 wrote:

I noticed the shovel with the bent handle costs twice as much. Nobody invented the hydraulic snow shovel yet?
--
LSmFT

I'm trying to think but nothing happens............
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On Tue, 28 Dec 2010 15:15:30 -0500, Rebel1 wrote:

I have a couple - a 24" plastic scoop thing (rather like the Garant one on the site you linked to) and an 18" metal shovel. I cleared around 100'x12'x1' with them last week so the propane truck could get through and my back's not complaining (some idiot put the tank waaaay round the back of our house :-)
With the scoop one I keep the adjustable handle short so I can grip the back of the scoop with one hand (with the other hand left on the end of the handle) and lift - I find it's easier to move snow out with less strain on the back doing it that way.
I'm indifferent about the curvy handle on that Ames one, I think. I expect that wedge-shaped blade would piss me off though; snow usually packs pretty well so it's useful to run the blade a few feet into the snowfall to pack it tightly before lifting it out of the way, and I could see a lot of it just falling off the back with a wedge-shaped design.
cheers
Jules
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