Snow shovels

Page 1 of 3  
Anyone have experience with the yellow Ames Snowboss shovel shown here?
http://search.gifts.com/find?keyword=snow+shovel
What I like about it is that the left hand has a handle to grip so the hand doesn't slide up a slippery pole away from the blade toward the top handle. But I'm not wild about its being made of plastic. And its 24" width can make the snow load heavy, especially on a warm day when the snow has melted and is heavy.
What's been your experience with shovels with offset poles (like the blue Ames Superlight 18" shovel to the right of the yellow one)? The claim is that they are easier on the back.
Thanks,
Rebel1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In snowy parts of Canada (here 10 to 15 ft. total every winter, 4 months) we distinguish between true shovels (to lift snow) and pushers (to push it along the ground. They require different technique, according to snowfall and terrain. Shovels are no more than 18" wide. Actual market purchases suggest no preference for bent or offset handles.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have 2 types of snow shovels:
A heavy duty plastic pusher like this:
http://s7.sears.com/is/image/Sears/07183770000?hei=500&wid=500&op_sharpen=1
and a metal lifter like the one on the right:
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/uimages/chicago/010609yohoshovels.jpg
After most snowfalls, I push and throw with the pusher. The lifter is for when the pushed-piles are too heavy. I still push as much as I can into piles along the edge of the driveway or walkway and then lift and throw smaller loads with the lifter.
For the deck, it's all lifter since I have to throw it over the railing.
I tend to shovel "wide" - a few feet up onto the lawn - and I throw the snow as far as I can. Not only is it good exercise, but if it doesn't melt fast enough, you can quickly find yourself having to lift the snow onto taller and taller piles as the winter goes on. I go "wide and far" from the beginning of the season so I'll always have a place to put snow if the big one comes.
BTW...I bought one of these in the fall, so I won't be pushing as much snow around this year, but I sure can throw it farther.
http://www.ariens.com/products_snow/sno_tek/sno_tek_24/Pages/default.aspx
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/28/2010 3:15 PM, Rebel1 wrote:

back. Also one shovel isn't sufficient. I have one steel blade shovel for the icy slushy stuff that the lighter shovels won't touch and two different widths of pushers.
Another thing I noticed is that the steel wear strips are made from junk steel anymore. Snow shovels used to last for many, many seasons. Now the strip is usually worn out after one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I drilled out the steel strip and removed almost as soon as I bought the pusher many years ago.
All it does is get caught on the driveway and walkway.
The plastic glides a lot easier over all surfaces, including the frozen grass.
Is my shovel a little smaller than it was a few years ago? Probably, but it's never been a problem.
I've looked at the pushers without the steel strip and they're just not as sturdy as mine. If I ever replace the one I have, I'll look for a sturdy one with the steel strip and then drill it out and toss it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/28/2010 4:48 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I can't see how that would work. You need an edge to clean down to the concrete.

I don't need to clean any unpaved areas so maybe that's why it works for you.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Umm...a plastic shovel has an edge. What do you think is left when you take the strip off?

No, it works for me because it works just fine on asphalt and cement and well as the lawn.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/28/2010 8:18 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

A blunt edge? I drilled out the rivets holding the remains of the strip last year just to see. I tried using it and the next step was to put it out on trash day. It might work if trying to clear a grassy area etc but useless if you want to clean down to bare pavement.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

By "you" I assume you mean *you*, not me. Since you've never used my shovel or seen my driveway after it's been shoveled, you certainly can't be claiming that *my* shovel is useless.
What can I say? Obviously you (allegedly) removed the strip from different brand shovel than mine. Maybe you didn't give it time to wear the plastic down to a sharper edge. I can't say, I wasn't there.
All I can do is repeat what I said before: *My* shovel works fine on all the surfaces I need it to: Asphalt, concrete and lawn. It cleans down to the bare pavement yet doesn't get caught on rough edges or the lawn.
You have my condolences that your shovel was "useless" after you removed the strip, but mine has been extremely use*ful* for many years.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/29/2010 10:02 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Well clearly I don't have your level of sophistication but I did manage to drill out 3 rivets...
And did you ever consider your criticism of a basic well proven commodity item is a little odd?
Most snow shovels have a steel edge. Manufacturers have made millions or maybe 10s of millions of them because it is a proven design and it works. Steel and rivets aren't expensive but why would they bother doing it if it doesn't work? I have honestly never heard anyone complain that the edge is a flaw and they needed to remove it before they could use the shovel.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your shovel had only three rivets holding on the edge? I don't think I've ever seen a riveted edge show shovel with fewer than five, and more is more common.

You mean like questioning the quality of Detroit iron from the late 60's and early 70's? Or Thompson's Water Seal? Both sold just fine, but they were/are largely crap products.

No one is arguing that a good edge is a bad thing. What I have an issue with is an edge that gets destroyed way before the shovel gives out. Then you have a hanging edge, so you have to grab a rivet gun, then another rivet goes, or the edge gets bent and/or burrs. It's bad edges that I object to, and if you've seen what they're selling in the stores, most of them have aluminum edges now.
I don't remove the edge until it becomes a lost cause. I was just using one shovel a little while ago (the shallower one that came without a metal edge) and was surprised to see that there are molded ridges and obvious attachment markings for a metal edge - but no edge was ever attached. I guess they sell the same shovel in two different versions.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/29/2010 7:03 PM, RicodJour wrote:

Only three remained. The steel edge was worn. So as a test I drilled out the remaining rivets. Next storm I tried it and then put it out for trash pickup.

But they have nothing to do with the edge on a shovel. Did you ever remember seeing advertising buy this snow shovel *because* it has a steel edge?
The steel edge is a good design and it works.

Every one I have seen is galvanized steel. I don't doubt there is an aluminum big box version.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The only "good" ones had carbon steel blades.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
... major snippage...

Here's what I don't get...
I told you what I did. I told you why I did it. I told you that it works fine for me. I told you that the same shovel has worked fine for years.
Why do you keep pushing back?
Are you expecting me to suddenly take it all back and tell you that I was lying?
Are you expecting me to go find the strip, put it back on and use it like the other 10's of millions of shovels out there?
Are you expecting me to go out into the garage and throw the shovel out because, based on your experience, it can't possibly work? Just what is it that makes you keep coming back to this ng and arguing with me?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/29/2010 7:59 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Because this is a discussion group and we are discussing things? What are you hoping to prove? No one has ever disagreed with you before?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*
How can you "disagree" with an actual event? *My* shovel works just fine on all surfaces without the strip. That's all I've said all along. *My* shovel works just fine on all surfaces without the strip.
What is there to discuss or disagree with? It's not an opinion as to whether *my* shovel works just fine on all surfaces without the strip because - wait for it - *my* shovel works just fine on all surfaces without the strip.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

We still have 2 shovels my husband acquired from work. They've got to be at least 20 years old. They are steel and square shaped. They have a bit of a bowl shape so they can hold a small pile of snow. The handles are very long (about 5 eet). They are excellent for digging out heavy snow and being able to throw it far or high up. If the snow is very heavy/wet, then I only shovel in layers. It leaves a bit of a snow mess so then I use a push shovel on the lumps left on the ground. I'm not sure what these shovels were intended for but they work great.
I just did a google image search and found what it looks like: http://www.hardwareandtools.com/Mintcraft-33261-PCL-FV-Shovel-Long-Handle -Square-Point-Fiberglass-Handle-1730613.html
My shovels have wood handles and the spade portion is painted green.
I found a product online called the Sno Wovel. I'd be interested to know if anyone has one and how they like it. Such as if it works with heavy snow. Lisa
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I saw that. Even watched the video. (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Thought it was crazy. Still do. But it gets good reviews. Might work for people with particular back problems. If it wasn't so big - and was cheaper to buy - I wouldn't mind trying it just for kicks For now though I'll take a pass.
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
... Major Snippage ...

I watch the video and here are my thoughts:
It doesn't seem like it would work well on narrow driveways where you are shoveling from side to side. Heck, if you include the operator it's almost as wide as a single car driveway. There would no room to maneuver across the width of a narrow area.
It doesn't seem like it would work for short people. Once the handle was adjusted to be comfortable for pushing, I don't know that you get enough leverage to throw the snow very far.
I'm not sure what you would do once the piles get high, like the ones on both sides of the EOD. I can left a shovel and either toss the snow high or carry it around the pile. I'm not how you handle that with the Sno Wovel.
Just my thoughts...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/29/2010 8:12 PM, Lisa BB. wrote:

I bought one like that at an industrial supply house a long time ago. Same shape as a snowplow blade. Really heavy and phenomenal when there is freezing rain/slushy/frozen conditions.
Essentially it is like having a big steel edge.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.