Snow Cover On Roof Provides Wind Protection?

Page 16 of 16  


Why do you think the cable needs to be moved _at all_ for the engine computer to reduce fuel flow?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

look 5 lines up and look 10 lines up
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in (Doug Miller) wrote:

O2 sensors,along with the throttle position sensor would cause the ECU to reduce fuel flow to maintain the proper fuel-air ratio.
The problem is electric control of the throttle butterfly. It leaves it subject to the whims of the computer's programming,any flaws it may contain,and electrical/electronic failures.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(Doug Miller) wrote:

the Obama "administration" likes mandating things.They are anti-freedom.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mar 2, 5:19am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

AS far as Toyota goes, at least _some_ of it is an electronic problem. A 'stuck throttle' does not cause acceleration unless the driver is already accelerating when it sticks.
I saw a clip yesterday on the news where a woman crawled into a parked car, started it. jumped curb, across sidewalk and 1/2 way into a store. Stuck throttle was her excuse. It must have also caused the car to shift into drive instead of reverse. Riiiigggghhhhttt.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
-snip-

I'd love to see a physics class [or Mythbusters] take out the words like "a car" and "x number" and "generally in the neighborhood" and "roughly". throw in a few things like inertia and the difference in a drive train and brake pads. . . and find out why none of the reports that I've heard have said "The engine was at full throttle, I was going 50 miles an hour and was able to get the car stopped with my brakes."
Even the guy who drove to the dealership with a full throttle engine who had the presence of mind to go to neutral, brake, go back in gear, accelerate. . . then back to neutral for control said his brakes would not slow the car while it was in full throttle position.
Looking for more proof for *my* thoughts- I found some middle ground in actual research by Car & Driver- http://www.caranddriver.com/features/09q4/how_to_deal_with_unintended_acceleration-tech_dept
In a nutshell- "Certainly the most natural reaction to a stuck-throttle emergency is to stomp on the brake pedal, possibly with both feet. . . . brakes by and large can still overpower and rein in an engine roaring under full throttle. With the Camrys throttle pinned while going 70 mph, the brakes easily overcame all 268 horsepower straining against them and stopped the car in 190 feetthats . . . just 16 feet longer than with the Camrys throttle closed. From 100 mph, the stopping-distance differential was 88 feet . . . We also tried one go-for-broke run at 120 mph, and, even then, the car quickly decelerated to about 10 mph before the brakes got excessively hot and the car refused to decelerate any further."
Maybe by the time you got to 10MPH you'd have the presence of mind to put it in neutral-
Don't know why they didn't try a Lexus. Would have loved to see what happened if you first tried the brakes-- then applied full power. Seems like that would have been human nature.

If you are going slow enough, and your brakes are good enough, I agree, you have a chance by mash 'em and hold 'em. Problem is- it isn't a perfect world. In the Calif crash, the car was a loaner whose brakes were already compromised. [still- it looks like shifting into neutral should have saved the day. but we don't *know* that they didn't try that.]
Audi & a couple other manufacturers have a shut off on their drive-by-wire vehicles, so hitting the brakes kills the throttle. I hate the idea of software on throttles, brakes, or steering-- but that one seems like common sense. OTOH- if this is a computer problem, what's to say that would work anyway.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote in

Don't forget m&m's and beef jerky while you're there.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
* U S * wrote:

The snow will blow. If it has turned to ice, then the chunks of ice likely will become missiles. We had 70 mph winds on Gulf coast during one of the 2005 blow-bys...forget the names. Lots of shingles missing in the neighborhood. It appeared, mainly, to affect old roofs. Very few trees down. Loosened concrete tiles from roofs, as well. It took all of my husband's considerable strength to retrieve one of our wheeled trash cans that was blowing down the street. Plywood over windows would be in order before the storm...not fun. We tried it once, then got hurricane shutters.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.