Snow Cover On Roof Provides Wind Protection?

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Huh?
Gusts to 70 mph expected. Weather guy said that snow on roof will lessen chances of shingles (asphalt, in my case) being lifted. Any truth to this statement?
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On Feb 25, 6:36 pm, hereiam@home. (* U S *) wrote:

Yes...until the snow blows off.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Well, if the bottom layer of snow on the roof has fused into ice, from the odd hour of sunlight, compression, and thermal cycling, that will provide a layer of protection. Of course a layer of ice or near-ice on your roof causes other things to worry about.
Finally broke down and bought a roof rake this year, for that one problem stretch and inside corner on the lee side of the roof that loves to form a snow cornice, and load the gutter up with several hundred pounds of ice. It helps, as long as I stay after it with each fresh snowfall. But I still wanna beat on whoever owned this place when addition was put on, for the stupid way they tied the roofs together, creating little dead pockets where the swirling air packs the snow into a fine foundation for the snow cornice. It resulted in previous owner having to replace the kitchen window, from where the stupid design and metal-wrapped gutter boards led melt water across soffit and into wall around window. I'll never wrap a gutter board- use rot-resistant wood, or fake wood. I had to peel the wrap down on the backside, and form a drain point for the water, to keep same problem from happening again. I'm sure that end of the gutter board is completely rotted in there, because there is a gap above the wrap and back of gutter, below the drip edge, such that water is forced in there when gutter are overflowing or full of half-melted snow/ice. I'll probably leave it for next owner to fix, because once you open up something like that, where do you stop?
--
aem sends...

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In typed:

Wellll, I don't know how long the snow will last in a 70 mph wind, but otherwise I suppose there's a bit of truth to it<g>!
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* U S * wrote the following:

the roof unless there are constant high wind speeds. Worse yet is that we have a travel restriction in effect. All non-emergency travel is prohibited. My power went out earlier, but I have a generator running but not much gasoline left. I was going to go get some in my 4x4 truck but I can't now with the travel restriction. Damn those anti-siphon gas tanks.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

We had 50" of snow within 4 days. This was a couple of weeks ago. It probably won't blow off roof. This time, you're getting hammered with snow. We're expecting only a few inches but monster winds. Power is still on. House generator will supply power for about two days but I'm worried about structural damage. Good luck.
Central Maryland

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On Fri, 26 Feb 2010 01:11:58 GMT, LiberalsNemesis@USA. (Jack) wrote:

Yeah, I'm in Maryland too. Baltimore. I had a wedding to go to, two weeks ago Wednesday. The roads were bad until we got 20 miles south of DC, but after that it was fine.
My friend had a Rav 4. I don't know what that is. Today my friend says it has unintended acceleration, but only a little. !!!!
I don't know. He did all the driving, 10 or 11 hours each way.
And when we got to Myrtle Beach S. Car., it snowed there too. :(

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mm wrote:

If I owned one of those Toyota vehicles affected, I would install an auxiliary engine kill switch before I drove it again.
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Tony wrote:

And when you kill the engine you loose both power steering and power brakes.
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LouB wrote:

Loose it, or it becomes more difficult? That would be a shame if I couldn't steer or brake my car because I ran out of gasoline. Are there any vehicles like that?
When I taught my niece to drive, in a large empty parking lot, at about 35mph I told her I was turning off the engine. Then I told her to make a left hand turn. She's a tiny little thing but she struggled and it did turn. As far as the brakes, if it's vacuum assisted you still have normal braking until you pump it too many times and runs out of the vacuum. Don't pump them, apply pressure until you stop.
I told her that if her engine ever dies for whatever reason, that will be the result, so be ready for it.
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wrote:

needs some muscle. At speed the steering is not much of an issue, while at low speeds it can be very difficult. Braking the opposite.(sorta)
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The good part about braking is you will have full power assisted braking until you pump the pedal a couple times... so Don't Pump it!
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wrote:

Under hard acceleration, you may lack the vacuum assist as well. Anyone who has driven a car with vacuum wipers knows what happens when you are flooring the gas pedal. The wipers slow dramatically or stop.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Vacuum assisted brakes have that large vacuum canister with a check valve. A second or so idling and it has enough vacuum to work, and a check valve so it works if your throttle is to the floor, or your engine dies, it still has enough vacuum for a couple pumps. Try it with your car in the driveway. Put it in park, turn off the engine, then pump the brakes. You should get 1 to 3 good pumps before you feel in the pedal that the vacuum assist is not working anymore.
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wrote:

Two is a pretty good guess, and a VERY good reason NOT to pump the brakes.
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On Tue, 02 Mar 2010 08:17:36 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Which is EXACTLY what was just said.
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On Tue, 02 Mar 2010 23:28:09 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Really? Who other than me said that under heavy acceleration, engine vacuum is reduced?
I'll give you a hint: NOBODY
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On Mar 3, 3:32 am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

And what you are missing (seems to be a habit) is that there is a _vacuum canister accumulator_ that permits full brake assist under all conditions (if the engine was running at all) for a couple of 'pumps'. Try it yourself. While diving shut off engine and step on brake.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

You don't even have to be driving, in the driveway turn off the engine in park and pump it a few times. You will feel it using up the vacuum.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Ahh, but are you talking about a high vacuum or a low vacuum?
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