Snow blower power ratings

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dpb wrote:

Yes, "per minute" is the key. Same as how horsepower is measured.
"Horsepower is defined as work done over time. The exact definition of one horsepower is 33,000 lb.ft./minute. Put another way, if you were to lift 33,000 pounds one foot over a period of one minute, you would have been working at the rate of one horsepower. In this case, you'd have expended one horsepower-minute of energy."
http://www.web-cars.com/math/horsepower.html
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Tony wrote:

Well, DOH! if 1-hp * 33,000 ft-lb/min/hp = 1 hp I guess it would follow that the definition of 1 hp <==> 33,000 ft-lb/min...
--
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wrote:

CC is cubic centimeters, CI is cubic inch, my new toro is 6.75 ft lbs of crap, it doesnt cut as well as an old 3.5 hp engine, the new ratings just decieve all. I thought my toro was 6.75 hp, I was ready to junk it because it bogs so bad.
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On Sat, 10 Oct 2009 12:20:17 -0700 (PDT), ransley

It is the "old" 4.5 HP, but because of speed limits it is really only 3 hp - assuming 2400 RPM limit.
On a 24" mower, the blade tip travels 75.36 inches (6.28 ft) per revolution. At 3600 rpm that is 22,608 ft per minute - well in excess of the mandated 19,000 limit. The limit is reached at just 3025 RPM. So IF it is a 24" mower, it is a 3.88 HP mower.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've never heard of two things mentioned here:
#1. a 24" push mower #2. a 2400 rpm limit
AFAIK, all small engines are governed at 3600 and that's where they operate.
s
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On Sat, 10 Oct 2009 19:41:38 -0500, Steve Barker

Well you are wrong on both counts. I use a 24" rotary "push" mower to mow my lot all the time, and current lawn mowers are rpm limited to prevent tip speeds in excess of 19000 ft/minute - and in some cases 14000. It's the LAW in Noth America for all home use lawn mowers. Apparently SOME commercial units may excede the tip speed depending on other fastors that I am not aware of.
It IS because of this that lawn mower power ratings were changed. The engine is rated at a given HP at 3600 RPM - but the equipment does not allow it to run at that speed so the HP rating is no longer valid.
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Not so! You neglected the time part of the conversion--it's (ft-lbs/Min). RPM is an input too all of this MLD
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On Sat, 10 Oct 2009 11:57:52 -0400, Van Chocstraw

PARDON????? My 140HP Corvair puts out 4,620,000 ft lbs of torque????????????????????????????
WOW!!!!!
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Thanks for the link. I have used it before but the formula that they gave had me somewhat baffled what is 10 over score 7? Is it 10 to the power of 7, 10 to the power of 1/7, 10 divided by 7? No explanation is given and I have not ever seen that way of writing a formula.
--
Ron


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Worn Out Retread wrote:

Try this converter: http://www.onlineconversion.com/power.htm
Apparently 5 hp IS 9 million foot pounds per hour.
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Talk to a local shop that sells and services them, you wont get any service at the big stores
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wrote:

That is exactly what I have been doing and they have no accurate information in this regard. They could only offer guesses.
--
Ron


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Worn Out Retread wrote:

the HP is really irrelevant. Don't worry about it.
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I guess that you are only going to look at your machine and not actually do some work with it. Work requires power and knowing what you have IS important.
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How will you know how much power it has? Surely not by the HP ratings on the engine.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

1 foot-pound is closely equal to:
* 1.3558179483314 newton meters A newton metre is dimensionally equal to a joule
A joule is the energy exerted by a force of one newton acting to move an object through a distance of one metre
1 joule is equal to:
* 1107 ergs (exactly) * 6.241509741018 eV (electronvolts) * 0.2390 cal (thermochemical gram calories or small calories) * 2.390110-4 kcal (thermochemical kilocalories, kilogram calories, large calories or food calories) * 9.478210-4 BTU (British thermal unit) * 0.7376 ftlbf (foot-pound force) * 23.7 ftpdl (foot-poundals) * 2.777810-7 kilowatt-hour * 2.777810-4 watt-hour * 9.869210-3 liter-atmosphere * 110-44 Foe (exactly)
Units defined in terms of the joule include:
* 1 thermochemical calorie = 4.184 J * 1 International Table calorie = 4.1868 J * 1 watt hour = 3600 J * 1 kilowatt hour = 3.6106 J (or 3.6 MJ) * 1 ton TNT = 4.184 GJ * Hiroshima's "Little Boy" (12-15 kt TNT) = 50-63 TJ
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Worn Out Retread wrote:

Lordy. Unless you are buying pro-grade gear, odds are it is gonna be an MTD anyway, no matter what brand name is stuck on it. The same size blower will have the same engine across all the house brands. Buy the size you need, and move on. Almost always, it will be adequate. The manufacturer has no percentage in giving themselves a bad reputation, so they match them up pretty well. Don't lose sleep over it- life is too short.
-- aem sends....
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wrote:

If a particular frame size is available with 3 engine options (which is normal) buy the middle one for normal use, the big one for heavy snow conditions, and the small one as an ornament. (or for light snow conditions)
My old 26 incher was available as a 5, 8, and 10 hp.
Mine was a 5 HP Tec Sno-King and was adequate for normal blowing, but stressed handling deep packed snow plough ridges. When I blew the 5 I put on an 8, which was the same block as the 5, so fit with absolutely no modifications.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You must be talking pro-grade from an equipment dealer. None of the stores around here that are open evenings and weekends, offer any choices in engine sizes. I'd wager the price at an equipment dealer is a lot higher than at the big-box, as well. Of course, you are up in Canada- I suspect there may be more of a market for heavy-duty stuff up there. Around here in Baja Ontario (aka lower Michigan), anything over 15" shuts down the city for a day or two.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

Bought my Ariens from a local mom & pop commercial tractor store for the same price as the big box stores.
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