snake in the back yard

We've recently cleaned up our back yard and spread some pea gravel where no grass will grow. It was always muddy when it would rain, so we gave up and just weeded the sparse grass down that did come up along with any weeds. The pea gravel looks nice in the path, but today we found a good size garter snake right in the middle of the gravel sunning itself. I've read they like to do that sort of thing, but now I'm not so sure if it's such a good thing, although we let it go in the back part of the yard.
I'm wondering if the warm pea gravel attracted the slithering creature. I've read conflicting information on whether or not they're venomous. Has anyone had problems with such snakes causing problems, or are they ok and mind their own business.
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Maggie

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On 06/11/2015 7:03 PM, Muggles wrote: ...

Possibly if it was otherwise yet cool; they are, after all, not mammalian.
If it was a garter snake it is certainly _not_ venomous and harmless; it'll catch and dispose of rodents and the like as a side benefit...
--




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On 6/11/2015 7:09 PM, dpb wrote:

I hope so. The neighbor behind my house lets their yard grow up with huge weeds by the fence between us. I guess that's why the snake showed up because of a plentiful food supply
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Maggie

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On Thursday, June 11, 2015 at 7:03:52 PM UTC-5, Muggles wrote:

No they are not venomous...they have reverse fangs that can snag and cause bleeding. I have been bitten many times...some are aggressive if you mess with them. I don't think this will be a reoccurring problem.
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On 6/11/2015 7:10 PM, bob_villa wrote:

Reverse fangs? uh I don't think I'll be picking the thing up for sure, now.
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Maggie

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They are not a problem. Just saw one near my garage. I just used a broom to send it away.
I don't know why they sometimes seek open spaces, it's like asking to be eaten by larger birds, raccoons, cats.
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Dan Espen

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On 6/11/2015 8:45 PM, Dan Espen wrote:

right. I'll have to remember to do that. Good idea. Thanks!
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Maggie

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On 06/11/2015 06:03 PM, Muggles wrote:

Snakes are good luck. The bigger ones help to thin out the mouse herds. Unless it's six feet long with rattles ignore it.
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On 6/11/2015 9:12 PM, rbowman wrote:

This was a small snake, but it still makes me nervous. I REALLY don't like spiders or snakes!
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Maggie

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Muggles" <" xyz wrote:

Garter snakes are not venomous. In the US, there are four types of venomous snakes...
1. rattle snake (numerous species)
2. copperhead
3. cotton mouth moccasin
4. coral snake
The first three are all pit vipers. Pit vipers have triangular shaped heads; the iris of their eyes is a vertical slit (like cats) rather than round. They are all easily identified by he triangular head. In addition...
Rattle snakes have the rattle
Cotton mouths have a white mouth interior; mature ones are almost black and are chunky.
Copperheads have alternating, irregular bands of brown/reddish brown and tan/cream. Unfortunately, so do some non-venomous snakes.
Coral snakes have alternating bands of red, yellow and black; so do some very beneficial king snakes.You can distinguish them because the red and yellow bands of the coral snake touch; they do not in the king snake. Additionally, coral snakes have a black snout, kings do not.
All snakes, even the venomous ones, are beneficial. Leave them be.
--

dadiOH
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On Friday, June 12, 2015 at 6:41:12 AM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

+1
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dadiOH wrote:

A venomous snake out in the woods is one thing ... a venomous snake in the yard where my grandchildren are playing is another . There is an overgrown empty lot next door to our house in Memphis . Our son and his family live in that house . Last trip to Memphis , one of their cats was bitten by a venomous snake RIGHT NEXT TO THE DRIVEWAY WHERE THE KIDS WERE PLAYING . That cat died in less than a minute , it was struck in the neck . Evidence was found close by of a nest with opened eggs , probably copperheads . A young copperhead was killed a couple of houses down just days before this happened . Now then , since all snakes are beneficial , should we just let them be and risk one of the neighborhood kids getting struck and maybe die ? I think not .
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Snag



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why not carefully claen up the vacant lot next door, and cut the grass occasionally.
just a bit of work can beautify the neighborhood and help make it safer too
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On Fri, 12 Jun 2015 07:41:00 -0400, "dadiOH"

Be aware that any breed of snake will rattle it tail when upset. Oh, BTW, pygmy rattlesnakes are near the same size as a garter snake, but near invisible on a brown dirt or old leaf background. The pygmy rattlesnake does not have real rattles but does have sharp teeth.
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