smoke from neighbor's condo - coming thru electrical outlet

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All nice answers, but as it's a defect in the apartment, why not let the apartment manager fix the problem.
I sure hope the smoke smell mentioned is tobacco not wires.
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I have to agree with Robert. You should notify your landlord before you do anything to the apartment. You may be in violation of your lease agreement. And, do you know for sure the smoke is coming from his apartment and the type of smoke?
An outlet can go bad even if nothing is plugged into it.
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As a person who is extremely sensitive to cigarette smoke, I can assure you that there was no doubt about it. The two people that lived next door to me somked 2 to 3 packs each per day. You could smell it coming out from under their door when you walked by, and you could smell their car several stalls away. They kept a west window open all the time, which put positive pressure inside their apartment, so the smoke oozed out of their unit anywhere it could.
I never bothered the apartment manager with small details that I could easily take care of myself.
-john-
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If you inject some phosgene under their door it will make cigarettes taste real bad. ;)
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Not something to screw around with http://www.bt.cdc.gov/agent/phosgene/basics/facts.asp
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You can buy packets of insulation made specifically for wall switchplates, outlets, etc. Check Home Depot or Lowes in the section where they sell weatherstripping and stuff.....
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Yes! This worked for me when I lived in a condo above smokers.
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On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 04:47:42 GMT, "Zwanz of Never"

Get you an exterior grade outlet cover. They have foam seals that should do a decent job sealing out the smoke and you can just open up the cover on either plug if you need to use it sometime.
I think they also make a foam insulator that goes between the face plate and outlet box that may also work.
Steve B.
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I had this problem when I lived in an upstairs apartment from a chain smoker (old house).
First, get an electrically safe can of foam insulation. Take the cover off the outlet and fill the gaps around the box (NOT IN THE BOX) with the foam.
Then get the insulation foams "plates" from Home Depot or wherever. Place this over the outlet. It should fit snugly. Then replace the cover.
If there is still an odor, get the plastic plugs that prevent kids from poking their fingers into the outlet and plug them in.
Good luck.

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to stop the airflow "so no air seems thru":
get the flat foam gaskets mentioned in this thread, at one of the warehouse home improvement stores if no place else has them, put them around all wall swithces and wall plugs, may as well get management to do your whole apartment, since the cost of the foam seals is very inexpensive
supposedly you can increase the efficiency of those foam gaskets by strategically applying some silicone caulk
also the child proof plastic plug ins for wall plugs might stop a tiny percentage of air flow (but the foam gaskets will stop most of the air flow around the wall plug)
there may be other holes in your walls or ceiling besides wall swithces and wall plugs (around windows and doors, maybe from a centrail hvac unit to your attic, from a fireplace area into the attic, around plumbing under sinks and behind showers, etc.), those other holes would need to be sealed also to stop the airflow into your apartment
look at it as your ship and you need to seal all leaks into it
there are more exotic things you could do to stop the airflow through your walls etc.if you were the homeowner but the above, done by your apartment management at their expense, may be best for you
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On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 04:47:42 GMT, "Zwanz of Never"

I suspect that even if you seal up that outlet you're still going to get that smell. A little void like this creating a noticeable smell in your condo suggests a negative pressure situation. That is, their condo has a slightly higher air pressure than yours. If so, sealing up that outlet will probably just move the smell to another one.
Do they leave a window cracked or keep their condo cooler than yours?
Steve Manes Brooklyn, NY http://www.magpie.com/house/bbs
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wrote:

Not sure...dont even know who they are! Just passed by their apartment and smelled the wafe of smoke coming from underneath the door...so thats how i know where its coming from
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The wiseass answer is four layers of duct tape. More practical, the other folks have the right idea with the foam cutouts.
I'm wondering if that's going to really solve the problem, but it's better than nothing.
Aerosol "Ozium" from the auto parts store works fairly well on smoke odor.
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There are kits for leakproofing an outlet in an outside wall, to keep the cold air from coming in. (Look for energy-saving things at the hardware store.) The same thing should work here.

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Zwanz of Never wrote:

If your home is really a condo, then you don't own the interior wall and the best you can do is to cover the surface of the outlet. If it were me I'd involve the condo board and ask them to seal up the leaky walls anywhere they exist.
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They make sealing kits for outlets/switches on exterior walls to prevent cold air infiltration. My 1st attempt would be to try one of these.
Dan
Travis Jordan wrote:

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It depends on the condo. My sister owns her walls.
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Not true in our neck of the woods. Here traditionally, the individual owns from the studs in -- i.e. studs are common space. Also, the actual public vs. private ownership should be the detailed in the condo docs.
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