Smoke Detectors

Is it really necessary to change the batteries in the smoke detector every six months? I would think once a year would be plenty, if even that often.
Mr Fixit eh
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A couple of bucks for peace of mind seems like a no brainer to me. But then, I usually always seem to wait until they start chirping.
Just like AC filters. Each time, I say that "next time" I am not going to wait so long, and then I do..............
Steve
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Depends on how often you like to get up in the middle of the night to track down that annoying once-a-minute "low battery" beep.
Yeah, sure, once a year is usually fine. Heck, spend some dinero on the fancy-dancy lithium batteries, and then don't mess with them at all until the 10-year lifetime of the detector is up.
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wrote:

Why is it that they always chirp in the middle of the night...my experience too....seems like too much of a coincidence....Ross
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wrote:

temps go down at night. battery thus has less charge. when it's on the edge, that's enough to trigger the chirp.
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On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 16:02:23 -0500, "Ross Mac"

They hate us. They know that if there is a fire we will leave them behind.
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Ross Mac wrote:

It isn't always during the night, it's just that the TV is on too loud during the day to hear the chirping.
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wrote:

I thought most have battery sensors that make it chirp to tell you the battery is getting low???
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Mr Fixit eh wrote:

Only if someone didn't put in an alkaline battery but instead installed a carbon-zinc or carbon-chloride type, which should never be used because of the poor shelf life. For alkaline batteries, every 2 years is adequate. Lithium batteries will last 10 years but should be used only in smoke detectors designed for them because the low voltage warning calibration is slightly different for them than for alkalines.
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Subject: Smoke Detectors Newsgroup: alt.home.repair => Mr Fixit eh <= wrote:>Is it really necessary to change the batteries in the smoke detector

Just change them every year (not 6 months) , or if they chirp before that.
A good time to change them is when you set your clocks back or forward for daylight savings time. (make it a routine)
Don't listen to these other cheap bastards. Your life and property are worth a few dollars a year for fresh batteries.
--

-Graham

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Mr Fixit eh wrote:

No, it isn't. The smoke detector will tell you when it needs new batteries. When it does tell you (annoying beep), change the battery. Always use Duracell or equivalent alkaline type battery. Not all detectors use the same amount of electricity. Batteries in my detectors all last longer than a year and some last over 2-1/2 years. Put a piece of masking tape on the battery when you put it in the detector and write the date on it. Then you will know how long they last.
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I've gotten into putting a little sticker on the smoke detector itself, that way I don't even have to open it up.
I just have to remember to look at the sticker now :-)
Steve
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Mr Fixit eh wrote:

I test my detectors (that's what the little test button is for) the first of every month. Then I replace all of the batteries when one of them fails.
Bill Gill
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When one fails, does that mean you have batteries going dead, and no warning? Scarey stuff.
later,
tom @ www.ChopURL.com
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snipped-for-privacy@intertainia.com wrote:

Jumping to (wrong) conclusions again. He said "when one (meaning a battery) fails." He didn't say when the unit fails the test.
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

In fact the battery going out is what causes the unit to fail the test. The unit test is primarily a battery test. As far as I know there is no way to test the detector, except of course to build a fire under it.
Bill Gill
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When the smoke detector goes off in our house the usual chant is "Dinners Ready"!!........Ross
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Bill wrote:

Now you've got me confused. I think the test is more of a circuit test than a battery test; its already got a built in battery check--the chirp. I've never tried to test a unit after the unit signals a low battery with chirps, but I bet it will still test good. If a unit fails the test without every chirping, I think something is wrong.
Sure you can test them and some manufactures give the instructions for that particular unit. If you have a barbecue, you can figure out how to test the smoke unit.
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