SMOKE DETECTOR- no need to replace batteries

1. You buy a hard-wired smoke detector
2, You splice onto the outgoing wires of the detector-an electric cord and plug.
3. You hang the detector at the top of a wall.
4. You plug it into the wall outlet below the detector.
Many Hard-wired smoke detectors have a back-up 9v battery in them. If the power goes out- you still have back-up power from the battery.
Hard-wired smoke detectors last for years and years.
Hard-wired smoke detectors hardly ever fail.
If you are tired of reading news stories about how little kids are dying from smoke inhallation because the battery operated smoke dectector only had a cheap Chinese or American made 9v DEAD battery in it:
Email your congressman and the CPSC and DEMAND THAT THE 110V / 9V COMBINATION SMOKE DETECTOR WITH A POWER CORD-
BECOMES THE LAW OF THE LAND !
OUTLAW ALL THOSE CHEAP SMOKE DETECTORS EQUIPPED WITH JUST A 9V JUNK BATTERY!
You can combine the reliabilityand longevity of a hardwired smoke dector with the ease of mobility of the battery operated detector by simply splicing a power cord into the hardwired detector!
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1. You buy a hard-wired smoke detector
2, You splice onto the outgoing wires of the detector-an electric cord and plug.
3. You hang the detector at the top of a wall.
4. You plug it into the wall outlet below the detector.
Many Hard-wired smoke detectors have a back-up 9v battery in them. If the power goes out- you still have back-up power from the battery.
Hard-wired smoke detectors last for years and years.
Hard-wired smoke detectors hardly ever fail.
If you are tired of reading news stories about how little kids are dying from smoke inhallation because the battery operated smoke dectector only had a cheap Chinese or American made 9v DEAD battery in it:
Email your congressman and the CPSC and DEMAND THAT THE 110V / 9V COMBINATION SMOKE DETECTOR WITH A POWER CORD-
BECOMES THE LAW OF THE LAND !
OUTLAW ALL THOSE CHEAP SMOKE DETECTORS EQUIPPED WITH JUST A 9V JUNK BATTERY!
You can combine the reliabilityand longevity of a hardwired smoke dector with the ease of mobility of the battery operated detector by simply splicing a power cord into the hardwired detector!
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That advice, while fine for someone traveling or such....would be illegal in a residential enviroment..
You really do need to get laid or something fella..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds like he's about to spontaniously combust!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You want to cite the code that makes it illegal or do always make wild unsubstantiated statements?
You want to also site for us- other appliances that would be illegal to plug into a wall socket for us?!
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (HA HA Budys Here) wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
misterfact wrote:

The very idea of a smoke detector running off the mains is insane.
First, very many fires are electrical in nature and will pop the breakers. No power, no smoke alarm.
Second, any fire stands a good chance of interrupting the electricty. No power, no smoke alarm.
Third, smoke detectors powered by the mains have no way of alerting the homeowner that the battery (if it has one) is kaput.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

I disagree.

If the home is wired properly, the smoke alarms will be on their own circuit. If there's an electrical fire (say, due to an overloaded circuit), it'll cause the _one_ breaker to trip, but it won't cause the electricity on _all_ circuits to be interrupted.
In any event, that's why many AC-powered detectors have battery backup.

Again, battery backup will compensate for this. I would think that by the time a fire was able to cause the electricity to go out, there would be more than enough smoke to have tripped the alarm. Remember - the only purpose of a smoke alarm is to alert the occupants so that they can get out. I certainly wouldn't care if the smoke detector stopped working after alarming for a few minutes, because the power went out -- I'd be out of the house by that point.

Even alarms that _do_ have a way of alerting the homeowner don't always result in the battery getting changed. No sense blaming the alarm for something that's the homeowner's fault.
One huge advantage of wired, AC-powered smoke detectors is that they can be connected together - if one goes off, they all go off. This can be useful if a fire breaks out in the basement, and the occupants are on the second storey. A detector that _only_ goes off in the basement might not be heard by people sleeping upstairs, but if _all_ the detectors alarm at the same time, they'll definitely be heard.
Regards,
George Wenzel
--
George Wenzel, B.A. (Criminology)
E-mail: snipped-for-privacy@recursor.invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


So insane that, after years worth of statistics, our building code _requires_ smoke detectors run from the mains to be installed in every house.
Hint: the statistics showed that mains-powered detector has a better chance of saving your life than than a battery-powered one.
Why? Because, for example, their statistics showed that >25% of all battery powered smoke detectors had dud batteries in them.

Will pop the breaker on the circuit with the fault. Not, if the house is wired correctly, the one with the smoke detectors on it.

If you're still in the house when the fire takes out the main, you're dead already.

False. Our AC+9V detectors beep every minute if the battery is dead.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Better think again. Everything you have stated is an indictment of the hard-wire smoke detector required in new construction, schools, apartments, etc. !!!!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is in fact required in commercial buildings, and even in a lot of new residential construction. And AFAIK, battery back-up is NOT required.

I'd be more worried about power failures, especially in areas with a lot of lightning. But apparently the desirability of not relying on batteries outweighs the risk of a loss of power.

You'll be out of the building by then.

The ones that have battery back-up do alert the homeowner. However the battery is typically a small lithium battery that will last the life of the smoke detector, since it is rarely, if ever used.
None of this is fail-safe, it never will be. The most dangerous smoke detector set-up is, fortunately, one that you can't buy (the one proposed by misterfact). The lithium battery powered ones, or the battery-backed-up mains power ones are the best choice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
misterfact wrote:
Bad advice!
First the wiring would not meet code (fire hazard). Second you would greatly reduce the effectiveness of the detector.
Many times the electric goes off during a fire. No power no alarm, unless that battery had been changed. I'll bet fewer people following your advice would bother to change the battery than do normally.
BTW I have hard wired smoke detectors, hard wired and I keep the batteries replaced once a year.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why don't you enlighten us, Joe - as to the difference between your hardwired detector with battery backup and the same detector plugged into a wall- other than if you unplug the cord!
What wiring would not meet YOUR fire code, Joe? The wiring in the detector itself; the cord wiring; ???? Enlighten us as to WHAT wiring, what manufacturer of that wiring, the wire's rating- what the hell are you talking about. Are you some sort of self educated electrician or what?
Just tell us the horrible unsafe condition that results when you hook a plug onto a hardwired smoke detector and plug it into the wall.
FYI- during a fire SMOKE is first given off and all detectors- battery or hardwired go off before it is damaged by fire- unless the fire happens to originate in the power circuit the detector is powered by and the circuit is immediately damaged and shuts off. This is hardly ever the case.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It sure is obvious to me that the code problem is with an unpluggable flexible cord being part of a permanently installed device. That sounds like nothing to do with the wiring in the detector - electricians and building inspectors aren't much concerned about that in UL-listed appliances!

1. A cord could be going up a wall in a high traffic area where it could be snagged and proper permanent wiring would not be. (Ever notice there are not many swag lamps with cords running down walls in high traffic areas?)
2. Someone may unplug it after a bad moment in the kitchen and forget to plug it back in. This would give one of the problems of battery operated smoke detectors - people disconnect the battery after a nuisance alarm and forget to reconnect the battery.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote in message
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

People actually took you seriously; good job!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Too often, putting it in a location recommended for maximizing ability to detect smoke will put the cord in a high traffic area.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
misterfact wrote:
> If you are tired of reading news stories about how little kids are

Speaking as metropolitan firefighter, it is my experience that the vast majority of battery only smoke detectors are not non-functioning as a result of dead batteries; they are the result of NO batteries which are removed for two reasons: A) someone burnt the toast, again, or B) some idiot got tired of listening to the LOW BATTERY WARNING (which they all have) chirping away for days on end.
And by the by, many localities already mandate hardwired detectors w/ battery back-up in new construction. Some even require the seller to retrofit at time of sale.
Now, in the future, please go to the lake when you feel the urge to troll.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.