Smoke alarm

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We have a couple of battery powered smoke alarms in our multi-story house. One is on the second floor, where the bedrooms are, in the hallway near the stairs. When my wife is cooking some things or baking, the fumes go up the stairway and set off the alarm. These fumes are barely noticeable, but the alarm is so sensitive that it reacts to them. We have to get a stool and remove the battery, then remember to put it back in when the cooking is done (I leave the battery on the stool right in the center of the hall, so if we forget, we trip over the stool and remember).
I like the location of the alarm, since it protects all the bedrooms. But I'm not happy having to remove the battery so often, and when you start getting old, it is harder to even get up on the stool.
I am looking for a solution.
I don't think getting a less sensitive alarm (if there is such a thing) is the solution, because I want a sensitive alarm if we ever have a fire.
I thought of putting in a wired alarm with a switch, but it would be too easy to forget to turn it back on.
I thought an alarm that had a timer so it could be turned off for an hour or two when cooking, and would then come back on, would work, but I haven't seen something like that anywhere.
Any recommendations.
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What kind of cooking is it that's setting this off? A smoke detector in an upstairs hallway should not be going off from routine cooking. I have a smoke detector located 15 ft from my ovens. It's down a hall, but there is no door and it's a straight, direct path from ovens to detector. It only goes off on rare occasions. Those would be when something is forgotten, burns and starts to smoke. Or when perhaps I'm roasting some vegetables on a sheet pan with olive oil and some smoke comes out when I open the door. In that case, I just use a dish towel to swirl some air around the detector and it shuts off. I can't imagine smoke getting to the point that it sets off a detector upstairs, without something being wrong.....
I guess it's possible that detector is especially sensitive. There is variation among them in how they work, exactly what they react to, etc.
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On 3/14/2013 9:53 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

[snip]

+1 Like beauty, smoke is in the eye of the detector<g>
You don't mention it, but have you tried swapping the smoke detectors out?
If not, try that first.
I'm not familiar with a timer switch that gives you a selectable "Off" time, but it would be rather simple to make one using the clock spring type wall timers and a NC relay. You could keep the whole thing low voltage and use the timer output to open the NC relay and after XX minutes it closes.
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Notat Home wrote:

Alarms are doing their job. No venting fan on your cook top?
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Pretty much what I was thinking. Exhaust fan.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
No venting fan on your cook top?
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wrote:

I had a smoke alarm that would be set off my steam from the cooktop. It was *NOT* doing its job.
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On 3/21/2013 4:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

And whoever installed it in a location where it would be affected by steam from a cooktop, bathroom, shower, etc. wasn't following instructions.
Most detectors I've seen in the past caution against such placement. MOF, I'm installing a new one in the alarm system right now and the instructions state quite clearly that the moisture can enter the sensing area causing false alarms. (This is with a photoelectric sensor vs. ionization chamber - not sure, from memory, if they have the same placement restrictions. I think so though.)
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On Thu, 21 Mar 2013 19:28:35 -0500, Unquestionably Confused

Not so much. Smoke alarms used to be quite sensitive and not at all selective.

Done and done. Still was set off constantly. We replaced that one with a model that had a sleep timer (too short but it worked), otherwise there would never have been any batteries in it. I haven't had trouble in some time, though.
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On 3/21/2013 10:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Really? Somebody better tell the manufacturer of the ones I'm installing. The install manual is dated December 2012 and the manufacture date on the units is 2/27/2013. That's where the instructions below came from.

Well, nobody is saying the damn things are fool proof. Nobody - including UL or NEC, etc. can figure out EVERYTHING or every placement that can interact with them. That's why they still equip them (at least the better ones) with silencing buttons (typically, same as the test button) to shut them down for ~ 10 minutes.
Not trying to be a wise-ass but maybe the cook in your house is not the best in the world? Maybe the detector was defective. Maybe...
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On Thu, 21 Mar 2013 22:54:27 -0500, Unquestionably Confused

You don't read very well, do you? Try again, this time try mouthing the words.

Good grief!

Good grief. Try reading. Then try thinking. You might find it amazingly productive.

You really *are* stupid. Nothing wise about you. Ass, certainly.
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On 3/22/2013 10:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:
Ever notice how, when unable to back up an argument with facts, krw resorts to ad hominem attacks?
A sure sign of ignorance when you look across the newsgroups and see his same patterned responses of ad hominem attacks.
He takes issue with posts and, as "proof" that he is the unquestioned authority, writes...

Plonk!
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wrote:

I agree with what you say about krw. He quickly gets hostile and goes on the attack when all that's required is a civil reply.
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On Sat, 23 Mar 2013 07:27:32 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Wow, another who must demonstrate is childishness.

I get annoyed when people refuse to read, then attribute things to me I didn't say. Strawmen are another favorite; one of your usual tools.
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On Mar 23, 11:39 am, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Yes, it doesn't take very much at all to get you annoyed. You should take some anger management therapy.
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On Sat, 23 Mar 2013 08:48:43 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

You should look in a mirror, T4.

Projecting, again.
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I have a similar prob. So I just slide a small, bright orange cover over the offending s/d.
They are like a small shower cap that fits snugly over the s/d. This happens at the start of cooking. Then when done, you can't forget that the plastic cover is on the unit. It is BRIGHT ORANGE.
Done and done... Works!
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On Sat, 23 Mar 2013 10:02:36 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Papa Pat) wrote:

I haven't had the problem (at least regularly) in 20 years, or so. The newer alarms are much more selective. False alarms seem to be a thing of the past.
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Does she use the kitchen exhaust fan? Any fumes should be going that way.
--
Dan Espen

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On 3/14/2013 10:36 AM, Notat Home wrote:

I suspect that you are discussing an ionization detector (the most common type) because you say that the fumes are hardly noticeable. I had the same problem with a smoke detector in my kitchen nook.
I solved the problem by replacing that particular detector with a battery operated photocell detector. They are not sensitive to invisible fumes; they react to particulates in the air, which are prominent in visible smoke. They're a little more expensive but readily available in big box stores. I predict that this will solve your problem.
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Peter wrote:

I agree. Changing the type of detector will probably work.
The OP can also get one with a "Hush" button on it to temporarily silence the alarm if needed. That would be better and easier than taking out the battery. He/she could also either leave a small dowel/stick near the detector to easily reach the "Hush" button to silence it.
Or, instead of mounting the detector on the ceiling, mount it on a wall near the ceiling -- more than 4 inches below the ceiling, and not more than 12 inches below the ceiling. This is an acceptable mounting location according to the detector instructions. If doing that places the detector within reach, that will make it easier to press the "Hush" button without having to use a stick.
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