Smelly rug

I bought a used rug recently that smells. The seller eventually told us that there had been a dog around that may have done his business on it. The rug is clean and I have since tried those sprays that are meant to neutralize old urine smells. The smell still won't go away. It *MAY* have diminished slightly but I'm not sure. Should I continue with doses of these sprays or is it a lost cause?
If it's truly an old urine smell the dog must have pissed all over it every day for months.
Thanks.
Paul
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An enzime deoderiser from a pet or hardware store may help
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m Ransley wrote:

or repeated doses of Fabreeze or Renuzit both work good on dog, fish, fire smell but I don't know how good it is on pet urine
cheers Bob
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I had some pet-urine smell problems on the carpet when I first moved into my apartment. I heard enzyme treatments were supposed to be good, and possibly available from pet stores, but I had good luck with a cheaper method (if you have access to a wet vac/steam carpet cleaner): 1. Heavy sprinkling of baking soda, brush/agitate into carpet, another heavy sprinkling. 2. Vaccuum thoroughly. 3. Weak vinegar (maybe 1/5 strength) solution in steam carpet cleaner, vaccuum thoroughly. I read somewhere that this combination works because pet urine has both basic and acidic components, and although I don't really understand how that is possible, the treatment took care of the smell. Good luck, Andy
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On 5 Mar 2006 22:29:10 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

What is the rug made out of? Wool? Polypropelyne? Nylon? Do you have a yard that you can stake the thing out in, or are you limited to the cleaning you can do in an apartment?
The first thing to do, if you can, is hang the thing outside for a couple days, let the sun and air at it, and beat the crap out of it. What you do after that depends on what it's made out of. You probably don't want to put peroxide on a wool rug, for instance.
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