"Smart" Meters made them sick

Page 10 of 13  


That pretty much says it might theoretically be possible, not that anyone has actually done it. You can still reload the firmware if it did get clobbered.
I would suspect that you just had another bad Caviar drive to add to my magnet collection if I saw it and it failed the data lifeguard tests. The answer would be in the error code.
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On Feb 14, 2:49 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Maybe. That would depend on what was left of the drive firmware. If there are no smarts at all, seems unlikely that your going to reload it's firmware through just the standard interface used by the PC.

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On Thu, 14 Feb 2013 12:03:01 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Why not?
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On Feb 14, 4:16 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Because the drive has to have enough of the correct fimware so that it can recognize the necessary commands, receive the new firmware, and program it into the drive's flash. If you wipe out all the firmware on the drive, it's just a brick.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I suspect most of the drive firmware is initially loaded via an ICP type hardware port with a specialty programmer, while firmware updates rely on the existing firmware being functional to enable the PC side interface to be used to load a new image. If I'm correct, reloading firmware on a damaged drive would require the proper programmer hardware module and software to run it.
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Per Stormin Mormon:

What kind of anti-virus were you using?
On my daughter's machine, Avast threw a warning once but my macho son-in-law just *had* to click the button that said "Ignore this warning" and the system got hosed beyond recovery.
It wasn't a Trojan, but a bad USB controller that moved me to a backup scheme where at least a couple of my backup drives are not readily available - i.e. I have to drive to get to them.
That way, when things go really South, and it hasn't dawned on me yet that something is hosing my backups as I attach them in an effort to recover... the non-availability will hopefully save me from myself.
I also have a rule - which I will hopefully have the presence of mind to follow - that once I am down to a single backup, I will never, *ever* attach it to the problem PC. Instead, I will make copies on another PC and use the copies.
--
Pete Cresswell

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wrote:

The easy way to do this is download Disk Wizard from Seagate/Maxtor and clone your C: drive. Store it somewhere and when you get some strange crash you have a good starting point. You can just store a disk image, you don't need a spare drive but that does make an easier fix. Refresh this clone periodically.
In that regard it is best to keep your C: drive as small as possible and keep your data files on another drive. Data is simple to back up and restore. The C: drive is harder to restore because of the way Windoze installs software. You really need a cloned drive.
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Per snipped-for-privacy@aol.com:

I use drive imaging utilities.
Started out with one of the many DOS utilities, moved to something called "ShadowProtect" for reasons that probably are not of interest here.
But, for me, losing the "System" drive isn't all that big a deal - because I keep my data on a separate drive/partition. It's the data backups that I am so obsessive about. I can rebuild a system.....
--
Pete Cresswell

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wrote:

Rebuilding a system drive is a pain in the ass. You have to track down all the install disks, the secret codes and such. Then you need to go through the applications and get all the configurations the way you like them, restore the cookies with all of your passwords and install all the updates. Data is a whole lot easier. You just copy it over and you are done.
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Per snipped-for-privacy@aol.com:

If you have it.... that was the point about having multiple copies and keeping some of them where I cannot get to them in the heat of the moment.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On Thu, 14 Feb 2013 16:23:30 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

microcode on a drive goes bad, it is going to be pretty difficult to get the clone back onto the dead drive. There are likely programs available similar to the old "low level format" used on MFM and RLL drives - but they will be VERY specific - kinda like the low level format was specific to both drive and controller back in the early days.
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On Thu, 14 Feb 2013 22:57:51 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Has anyone actually seen a drive with a virus clobbered firmware? I think if I see a corrupted drive I am thinking deer, not unicorn.
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On Thu, 14 Feb 2013 23:15:58 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

involved - and the drives were not field recoverable. The MPG series Fujitsu comes to mind. The earlier Japanese Fujitsu drives were bulletproof. They started building the MPG series in Thailand and the failure rate within warrantee went up to aproxemately 75%, and one year out of warranty closer to 90%. It put Fujitsu out of the desktop computer hard drive business in a rather spectacular fashion.
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On 2/15/2013 11:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Back in the 90's I was building and selling a lot of white box computers and one of my suppliers started selling a very inexpensive line of hard drives manufactured in India. I don't remember the name of the darn things but an unusual amount of curse words often drowned out the actual name whenever anyone dared mention the accursed things. ^_^
TDD
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On Sat, 16 Feb 2013 00:46:49 -0600, The Daring Dufas

from my memory. About half the price of it's next competition, and about (being really optimistic hear) 1/10 the quality. Made by Tata perhaps??? The first "nano-drive"
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On 2/16/2013 11:00 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The memory of those things is like the memory of the time I wet my pants in the second grade. You want such a memory to be dim and distant. ^_^
TDD
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On Feb 16, 12:08 am, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

How do you know the failure was specifically from microcode?
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On Feb 14, 10:57 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I wouldn't bet on that. How do you talk to something when there is no one home? The drive has to have enough valid firmware to enable it to recognize commands. If you screw with that, I don't ee how you're going to get new code into it with the drive in a normal PC. I would think it would then require connecting to the drive with a special programming adapter of some kind to put the code into it, if that is even possible.
You would think that the drives would be built so that the firmware could not be changed. But apparently according to that previous post citing a drive manufacturer, it is theoretically possible to screw with the firmware. Now that he's told the world it's possible, it's probably raised the level of interest for hackers.....
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On Fri, 15 Feb 2013 07:57:06 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

I would worry about that when it actually happens. In the mean time I will assume drives crash on their own and deal with my data that way. Drives are consummables anyway
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IIRC, it was AVG paid version.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Per Stormin Mormon:

What kind of anti-virus were you using?
Pete Cresswell
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