Small safe/container for disaster protection in basement...

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On Tue, 15 Oct 2013 09:15:09 -0700, RobertMacy

I forgot to say that I don't know the answer to questions about contracts partially completed when one party dies. If it was just the goods it's probably simple, but services, for which the other party may have bought materials, or even started on the work, etc. I don't know. Esp. if it's work his survivors are opposed to, once they find out one of them owns whatever is being worked on.
For example if it's just seeding and fertilizing and putting down some sod, I'd tell the guy my father hired to go ahead with it, and I would get my father's check back and pay him myself, If it's building an observatory with a telescope in the back yard, in the city with all the city lights, I'd rather have the money. I don't know what the law is.
But those are contract issues.
All I claimed to know was whether a check was still good or not.
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On 10/16/2013 4:50 AM, micky wrote:

You know so little that you should just quit trying to prove to us how ignorant you are...

And you are wrong about that when you say that a check becomes non-negotiable upon the death of the maker.
From the Uniform Commercial Code (governing transactions UNIFORMLY in the United States)
§ 4-405. DEATH OR INCOMPETENCE OF CUSTOMER.
(a) A payor or collecting bank's authority to accept, pay, or collect an item or to account for proceeds of its collection, if otherwise effective, is not rendered ineffective by incompetence of a customer of either bank existing at the time the item is issued or its collection is undertaken if the bank does not know of an adjudication of incompetence. Neither death nor incompetence of a customer revokes the authority to accept, pay, collect, or account until the bank knows of the fact of death or of an adjudication of incompetence and has reasonable opportunity to act on it.
(b) Even with knowledge, a bank may for 10 days after the date of death pay or certify checks drawn on or before that date unless ordered to stop payment by a person claiming an interest in the account.
This certainly seems to contradict your unequivocal babblings which were unsupported by anything other than "I KNOW" since, as we all can now see, you DON'T!
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On Wed, 16 Oct 2013 05:47:36 -0500, Unquestionably Confused

Section bt certainly does seem to contradict some of what I said, A little looking has shown me that this is a little complicated. When I've read more I'll get back to you.

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On Monday, October 14, 2013 12:32:51 PM UTC-4, Ralph Mowery wrote:

We filed one copy of our wills with our county registrar of wills and put another in a little safe that our kids know about.
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On 10/14/2013 11:04 AM, dadiOH wrote:

unless the bank is a block from the Gulf of Mexico or somewhere similar.
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From personal experience, not very 'safe' either.
Ms. and I inventoried EVERY item that went in, we had a well documented complete list that we double checked for accuracy. Next time we opened the box, found several items missing, and unbelievably some substitutions. We confronted the bank, they claimed impossible. They went through that song and dance about double keys, etc etc. Being pragmatic here, I said I didn't care that it was impossible, I cared it happened and told them how we had inventoried every item, the next time we opened the box, nothing had changed, hmmmmm. After that experience, I just keep the items somewhere else. and guess what? nothing ends up missing.
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On Tue, 15 Oct 2013 08:38:19 -0700, RobertMacy

I believe you, not them. There is no reason someone can't make a copy of the customer key before the customer rents the box. Except fear of the law or of being fired and a lot of people don't fear those things much.
I'm sorry this happened to you.

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sentimental value. The loss just 'plays' with your brain. You keep trying to believe them [bank institution] about the security aspect and the impossiblity of it happening. Keep questioning your own 'sanity' However, there were TWO of us cross checking this time.
I posited the possibility of a key copy and was told how the person who goes with you to the box observes that the number matches the requested box number on the card, so that could not happen. Every scenario had an answer, so I gave up and later reclaimed all the contents from the box and stored elsewhere.
About five years later we were watching a film and one of the actors made the comment something along the line of "Thank God they put it in a safe deposit box, at least we can get it." Say What?! Do the writers make this up, or is this based on some reality from somewhere?
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On Tue, 15 Oct 2013 09:32:03 -0700, RobertMacy

Well of course the key you have matches the box number. The problem is that some other key also matches it.
I know someone else who had some of this happen to him, or I might not have been so quick to believe you. But you and he make two.

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On 10/14/2013 07:41 AM, John Albert wrote:

Yes. Even if it is sealed, warm/cold cycles will cause condensation, which will feed the mold. Since I doubt any consumer enclosure would actually be hermetically sealed, you will want to refresh/change the silica gel from time to time.
Jon
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John:
Another option to consider is renting a larger safety deposit box at your local financial institution.
But, you've been shopping at the wrong stores. I would go to may local locksmith's shop and see what they have in the way of small safes. But, safes are more meant to be tamper resistant than they are water resistant.
If I was wanting to make things waterproof inside such a storage box, I'd buy one of those home vaccuum packer's for food or clothing. They advertise them on TV so that you can vaccuum pack your own food and pack a quilt into a bag the size of a baggie. If air can't get into such a bag, water can't either.
I think if I wanted to protect something from fire, I'd put it in a vaccuum bottle like you find inside every Thermos.
If you can vaccuum pack your documents, roll them up and put them in a vaccuum bottle, they would survive everything but a fall.
I'm now thinking that if you can stopper up that vaccuum bottle, and store it inside a metal bucket of water...
--
nestork

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On 10/14/2013 09:41 AM, John Albert wrote:

Surplus ammo boxes are pretty good...but really you need to store copies of everything odd-site.
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Costco currently has (online only) a SentrySafe 1.23 cuft electronic USB-connected Fire Safe for under $200 which looks interesting
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On 10/14/2013 9:41 AM, John Albert wrote:

You can always get a vacuum food sealer that would do dual duty in the kitchen and in the office for sealing anything in a vacuum sealed plastic pouch. Heck you could probably protect documents in zip lock freezer bags too. ^_^
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
http://tinyurl.com/6gtrswu
TDD
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For that price, you could buy a food printer and make as many copies of your food as you wanted.
And you wouldn't have to save the food at all, except on a harddrive or flash drive. Then when you're hungry, just print some.
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wrote:

But HP charges a fortune for the cartridges.

Ever hear of "stiction"?
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banks get notified of people dying to freeze their assets and access to everything.........
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On 10/14/2013 9:41 AM, John Albert wrote:

I keep a can of silica gel (renewable kind that you pop in the oven for a couple of hours when the top changes color) and keep both some handguns and documents within.
Dispense with the desiccant and just use plastic bags and you should be fine. For valuable papers, I'd think that zip lock bags would do the trick.
"Problem" with the "fireproof" (actually, resistant) safes is the gypsum material used to insulate is designed to attract moisture - that's part of it's insulating/fire resisting schtick<g>
Take a clue from the Preppers and make a PVC tube sealed on one end, screw plumbing cap on the other - liberally lubricated with silicone grease, toss some desiccant packs in with the papers and put the whole kit in the safe.
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Hi John,

I have a small Sentry 1170 fire safe, but we don't store much in it. These aren't waterproof, so we haven't had any issues with mold growing inside. "Supposedly" when there is a fire, the lid kind of melts or fuses to the box sealing it off from heat and water. I hope I never need to test it. :)
Also, most fire safes are not rated for "media". In other words, they keep the contents below 400 degrees or so to prevent paper from catching fire. However, most media such as video tapes, CD's, or hard drives would likely be damaged by these temperatures. Media Fire Safes exist, but cost much more.
Finally, fire safes are rated by the length of time they offer protection. In other words, they may only protect your valuable papers for an hour or two before the contents get hot enough to burn. What happens if your house burns for three hours?
A much better solution than a fire/water safe container is redundancy. Make copies of everything and store them in more than one location. I use a safe deposit box at the bank to store my backup hard drive and passports. However, you could also store your duplicates at a friend or relatives house, or even in a storage unit.
By having duplicates any one of the single items can be destroyed, but you can still retrieve one of your backup copies from the other location. For instance, if your house burns down and falls into the sea, you can still get to the safe deposit box at the bank. If the bank falls down in an earthquake, you'll still have your copies at home.
If possible, you should try to select locations that don't share the same risks. In other words, don't store papers at your neighbors house if you're both in a flood zone. I live on a hill so I don't have to worry much about floods. On the other hand, forest fires are a risk here but the bank downtown doesn't have to worry about that.
For your digital media (hard drives), remember to rotate your drives routinely. This will prevent the mechanisms from sticking due to unuse, and will ensure your backups aren't too outdated.
Take care,
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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