Small light cordless drill with light

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I want to buy a small, light, cordless drill with LED lights that shine on what I am drilling or screwing. I think I want one with a lithium battery.
Can anyone recommend a good model? I will be using it mostly to drive small drywall screws and to drive and remove small screws like the ones in computer cases. I need a keyless chuck so that I can use standard drill bits. I used to have a Skill 3.6 volt drill. It had plenty of torque for my needs.
Thank you in advance for all replies.
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On 10/1/2012 2:37 AM, Daniel Prince wrote:

You need a light when you're screwing? A friend of mine had a small Makita LXT Lithium-Ion cordless drill that he loved and it was very handy and easy to use. ^_^
http://www.factoryauthorizedoutlet.com/%5Cmakita%5Cus%5Cproducts%5CFD02W.asp
http://tinyurl.com/8dgucf7
TDD
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On Mon, 01 Oct 2012 03:26:31 -0500, The Daring Dufas

you *definitely* want one with a lithium battery.

I snickered when I saw that there was one on my Milwaukee 12v drill [and the Bosch impact driver that I bought later] But on the drill I've found it hand a few times-- my eyes aren't what they once were- and a little extra light right where I'm trying to find a screw head is handy.
Jim
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I notice that this drill comes with two batteries. Do you know if the charger is smart enough that I could leave the other battery in the charger without it being over charged? Do you know how long the batteries used in the drill would last with light use? Many years ago, I read that lithium batteries only last two to four years no matter how much or little they are used. Is that still true?
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On drills and drivers that I have had and have now, including an older Makita, the charger is smart and will not overcharge your batteries. However, once the battery is charged and the charger shuts off, the battery begins to self-discharge. This does not automatically trigger another recharge cycle. I have to pull the battery out of the cradle and reinsert it to do that. So I can't abandon the thing for 3 months and then walk up and start using it without planning ahead. Perhaps that's changed with newer stuff.
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On Monday, October 1, 2012 2:09:26 PM UTC-4, Smitty Two wrote:

Lithium doesn't self-discharge nearly as quickly as the old NiCd batteries. Months vs. days.
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On 10/1/2012 12:40 PM, Daniel Prince wrote:

Since I don't own it, I just used it, I wouldn't know about its characteristics but I'm sure the website has that information. ^_^
TDD
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In the description it says:
Blows/Min.(BPM)     Low 0-6,000, High 0-22,500
I have never used a hammer drill. Am I correct when I assume that I would not want to use the hammer function when drilling into wood? Would I want to use the hammer function when drilling into steel? When should I use the hammer function and when should I not use the hammer function?
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Hammer function is used only with masonary bits, and only for holes through cement or rock. Other than that, simple drilling is used.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I have never used a hammer drill. Am I correct when I assume that I would not want to use the hammer function when drilling into wood? Would I want to use the hammer function when drilling into steel? When should I use the hammer function and when should I not use the hammer function?
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What about driving hex head bolts or drywall screws?
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Hammer drill provides some forward and back action, which helps break up cement. I would never use hammer drill for driving bolts or screws (which need rotation).
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:

What about driving hex head bolts or drywall screws?
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Never use the hammer function for driving screws. The "hammer" motion is along the axis, which will tend to break the lands you're trying to create with the screw. OTOH, a impact driver uses a radial impact which tends to break friction, advancing the screw along the threads.
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You use a twist drill bit and only rotary motion when you want to CUT a hole through a material like wood, steel, plastic, aluminum, etc.
You use the hammer function and a masonry bit to BATTER a hole through masonry materials like brick, concrete, rock, mortar, etc.
Consequently, a dull masonary drill bit works much better than a dull twist drill bit cuz there's no cutting involved. It's all a matter of bashing the material in front of the bit into rubble (that gets augered out of the hole by the flutes).
If it wuz me, I wouldn't use the hammering function with a keyless chuck unless you're drilling into masonry with a masonry bit. I have a Hilti rotary hammer with an SDS chuck, and as a freebee I got a keyless chuck accessory that could be installed in the SDS chuck for using twist drill bits up to 1/2 inch in diameter. The owners manual warned me never to use that keyless chuck accessory when the tool was in hammer mode because the keyless chuck was press fit together and the pounding action of the tool could shake it apart. Admittedly, the hammering action of your cordless drill won't be as strong as a corded rotary hammer, but if it wuz my cordless drill, I'd play it safe and not use the hammer function unless you need it (meaning you've got a masonry bit in the keyless chuck and you're drilling into masonry).
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On 10/1/2012 7:36 PM, Daniel Prince wrote:

The Makita isn't necessarily a hammer drill. The description is for a "Cordless 3/8'' Driver-Drill". It's more than likely an impact driver which makes the task of installing screws in hard materials much easier. If you look closely at the chuck,you'll see that the impact function can be disabled so the tool becomes a strait variable speed drill. ^_^
TDD
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On Tue, 02 Oct 2012 01:28:04 -0500, The Daring Dufas

A hammer drill is great for driving things where lots of torque is needed. They suck at jobs where having torque control is important [like when you're driving self-tapping screws into sheet metal.]
If I could only have one, I'd keep my Milwaukee with the torque control. But you'd have to fight me for my Bosch impact driver.

Chuck vs hex is something to think about too-- That one has a chuck. I like the hex, especially now that it is pretty easy to find decent bits with hex ends.
Jim
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Are you confusing hammer drill, and impact drill?
When I use a hammer drill (masonary bits, and drilling through cement or rock) I don't use a lot of torque. I use high speed, light pressure, and not much torque is needed.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
A hammer drill is great for driving things where lots of torque is needed. They suck at jobs where having torque control is important [like when you're driving self-tapping screws into sheet metal.]
If I could only have one, I'd keep my Milwaukee with the torque control. But you'd have to fight me for my Bosch impact driver.
Jim
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On 10/2/2012 7:02 AM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

The little Makita appears to have a torque clutch like many driver/drills. I have owned a Bosch corded 1/2" hammer drill for years that's wonderful because the high impact rate which sounds like a mini-gun, allows me to zip right through concrete and masonry items. I've had for years for heavy drilling and driving a corded Milwaukee 1/2 Hole Shooter that can break your arm if you're not careful. Back in 93 I bought a Black & Decker 12volt cordless that was produced before Black & Decker bought out DeWalt and it's identical to the newer DeWalt 12volt cordless drills except it's black. I've only replaced the batteries once since I bought it. I did have one of those Bosch impact drivers but sold it when I needed some money quick since it was new I was able to sell it for what I paid for it. O_o
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I'm going to be preemptive and suggest you take all the forthcoming "keyless chucks are junk" comments with a very large grain of salt. I've said it before: keyless chuck technology itself is outstanding. It's about the only thing you'll find in a machine shop these days, to the extent chucks are used in place of collets. Junk, however, is junk, and your average Harbor Freight keyless chuck may well fall in that category.
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On Mon, 01 Oct 2012 00:37:47 -0700, Daniel Prince

Less that a year ago I was looking for the same type of tool as you. I finally selected a Bosch PS31-2A 12V Lion. I've owned and used several drill drivers over the years and so far this is the handiest and best one I've owned.
The led helps tremendously when trying to find screws or hold in those dark corners. I've recently renovated an entire home and used this for everything with a screw: door hinges, drilling/installing locksets, repairing doors, securing cabinets to the wall, hinges to the doors and knobs on the drawers; Literally everything that a screwdriver and/or drill was required. Comes with two batteries and a quick charger which does a full charge in 30 niutes. I would routinely run 1 1/2 days of use before having to replace the batt.
Here's a link: (Amazon.com product link shortened)49141363&sr=1-4&keywords=bosch+drill
Good luck.
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This drill has a 3/8-inch sleeveless chuck. I do not know what a sleeveless chuck is. Can it use standard drill bits?
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