Small hole in glass window - what's available for fix?

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Either someone did this with a BB gun, or I did this with my lawn mower, but one of my windows (double-pane, removable inner pane) has a small hole (maybe 1/4" in the middle of a 1/2" crater) and a couple of short cracks radiating outward from the crater. This is (naturally) in the outer pane. This is plate glass, about 1/8" thick.
I know that car windshield repair commercials show some sort of clear liquid being injected into a windshield crater and makes the crater and cracks disappear. I don't need the fancy equipment - just the liquid.
Anyone know what it is, and does the Home Despot (or other hardware stores) sell it?
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Home Guy wrote:

Hi, Double pane? The seal is gone now whether hole is fixed or not. R value near zero. Better replace the panel B4 weather gets cold.
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Ok, I think this will do it:
http://www.walmart.ca/Automotive/Auto-Maintenance/Specialty-Repair/Professional-Windshield-Repair-Kit
Canada Tire would probably also have something like this.
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It will ONLY work on laminated glass.
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Ron wrote:

I know that's what it says, but cracked laminated glass is still broken glass all the same. This stuff has to "stick" to glass and fill any cracks in the glass - regardless if there's a layer of plastic in the glass or not.
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Fine....go ahead and buy it. I was only in the glass business for close to 25 yrs (the majority of it in auto glass), but you know more about it than I do................
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Ron wrote:

Did you ever try to patch or fill-in a crater-hole in thin plate glass with this automotive resin stuff?
Or did you never have the opportunity or need to do so?
If you have first-hand experience with the failure of this automotive repair resin on ordinary non-laminated plate glass, then I will pay attention and carefully read your account of any such attempted use.
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See my other post.
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On 9/28/2011 5:41 PM, Home Guy wrote:

Lotsa luck in getting the resin in the cracks without pulling a vacuum on the broken area. Google for a picture of how windshield star repairs are done, maybe it will make sense to you. Go ahead and try- you can't make it any worse.
--
aem sends...

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And, it's not always as simple as some of those videos make it out to be. When I was in the glass business I had a professional windshield repair kit/machine, and it was still a PITA to get the resin to flown into the cracks sometimes. There is a flexing technique that sometimes has to be used. Sometimes you have to heat the inside of the windshield with a small torch. Not just any "Joe Blow" can successfully repair a stone chip. Especially with those kits from an auto parts store.
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On 9/27/2011 8:26 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Read it again- removable inner pane, not insulated glass. For OP- forget it- there is no pretty repair. The car windshield repairs work because they have a plastic center layer, and you can suck all the air out as you are adding the plastic. No way to do that with air on both sides of pane. If you can't afford to replace right now, just clean the area, and apply clear tape over it- that should get you through the winter. If you wanna disguise it, get one of those bird stickers that supposedly prevent bird kamikaze attacks. But if you can remove the frame containing the damaged glass to carry it in to the window shop, you may be surprised how cheap the repair is.
--
aem sends...

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I misread it too, but the bottom line is it can't be "repaired". It needs to be replaced. And if it's the kind of Anderson that I think it is, he will need a router, or be damn good with a hammer and wood chisel.
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Ha....if he has a typical wooden Anderson from 25 yrs ago it's probably an Anderson that you need a router to get the glass out. A lot of the Andersons from that era (and earlier) built the frame around the glass!
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I believe there is only one brand. Andersen. I misspelled it. I just know that when I first got into the glass business, the AnderSENS that we had to replace the glass in didn't have any stops. We had to use a router to replace the glass, and then pay a carpenter to come behind us and do the rest.
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On 9/28/2011 7:24 PM, Ron wrote:

Sigh. BTDT. Spent several months trying to chase down parts for 1961-vintage Andersen crank-out casements when preparing my Grandmother's house for sale. Never did find all the parts, but found enough to make the place presentable. Outer panes on those were held by putty, though- I think they were before the assemble-frame-around-glass era. The removable inner panes were exactly as described, though.
--
aem sends...

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Ron wrote:

Why should it matter whether or not there's a plastic layer buried somewhere inside the broken / cracked glass?
If this resin is supposed to flow into cracks and seal them, adhere or bond the cracked surfaces together, then we're still talking about a glass-to-glass interface that needs bonding / sealing.

This is in a small commercial building that does not have a humidifier as part of the HVAC system, so there will not be any fogging.
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Because, before the resin is pumped in, a vacuum is applied to remove all of the air from the runs (cracks).
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Ron wrote:

What does that vacuum process have to do with whether or not the glass is laminated?
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Because you can't pull a vacuum on a single pane of glass.
You have a hole through the glass and runs. All you will be doing is sucking air. Not to mention that the resin goes into the syringe before you do anything.
Syringe adapter with double-sided tape goes directly over the impact point. Then you add the resin. With nothing but a hole there, the resin has nowhere to go but on the ground.
I guess (and this is a big guess) you could try to put a piece of tape on the opposite side on the impact point and runs to try and draw a vacuum, but then you might make the runs get even bigger when you apply pressure to the tape and glass. I doubt this would work anyway, because as soon as you put the kit/syringe on the pressure cycle it will probably start to push the tape free. Hell, just putting the syringe adapter in place could cause the glass to run out. At least on a laminated piece of glass you have some support from the other piece of glass.
If you have your mind made up that you aren't going to replace this piece of glass, then just fill the hole with some clear silicone. That will take care of the hole. The runs may never ever spread. Only time will tell.
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Ron wrote:

Why can't I create a vacuum on one side of the glass (with the right combination of suction cup and syringe) while applying the resin from the other side?
There would be no lamination layer in the middle to act as a barrier.
How thick or viscous is this resin? I take it that it's not like that acrylic plastic resin that just runs all over the place into all the cracks without much effort. ?
And besides, how often do you actually fill a hole in a car windshield, vs just a crack pattern?
In my case, I've got a hole that's about 3/16" diam. in the middle of a crater that's about 1/2" diam, with maybe 2 short cracks about an inch long running from the hole into the glass in 2 different directions.
Can this automotive resin form a patch to fill in the hole and crater?
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