small engines

To discourage fuel deterioration in small 4 cycle engines how much fuel is recommended (i.e. what % of tank should be kept in it)? I've heard a range of recommendations from empty to full.
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On 11/13/2015 8:54 AM, Frank Thompson wrote:

For how long? I've never fooled with them at all for over winter following dad's footsteps and in 70 yr never had any issues at all. Of course, it's pretty dry climate here...
When were in TN/VA for the roughly 30 yr where was more humid I'd simply top 'em off for the (pretty short) winters to minimize volume available to allow for condensation with same result.
--


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Depending on how long of time, but for short periods of a couple of weeks, full is better. If months or longer, then run it dry. That ethanol fuel is especially bad to deteriorate in short periods of time.
If you can find it the ethanol free fuel is the way to go. It lasts much longer. I have gotten in the habit of using it and also someof the Stay-bil with it. That seems to work fine for me.
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On Fri, 13 Nov 2015 10:13:30 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

run the float bowl dry whenever I store them - even for a week. Generally store with the tank topped off - ready for next use.
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For the engines that have a fuel cutoff, I do cut it off and let the bowl run dry every time and leave the gas in the tank. I do that to my 5 kw generator that I start every couple of weeks. Mainly to burn out some of the fuel in the tank so I can put in some fresh fuel. No often than I really need it, I think I should just run all the fuel out and let it go at that. I just want it to be ready if I do need it. Often I think about adding a cut off to some of the other engines so I could do the same thing.
I use the ethanol free in all the small engines. Wish that it was not about a dollar a gallon more than the regular gas so I could use it in the cars. I don't think anyone but the farmers and politicians want anything to do with the ethanol mess.
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On Fri, 13 Nov 2015 12:42:03 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

I agree ethanol is a political boondoggle that is net really god for anyone but the factory farmers and the politicians they fund but it is not the end of the world. Just buy it and burn it right away. You will not have any trouble. There are lots of issues with storing it tho.
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Even using right away can cause problems with some small engines. It tends to eat away at some of the rubber type seals. A chain saw comapny had to recall and change the gas caps as they would swell up and not fit correctly.
A friend has one of the old T model Fords and that ethanol fuel gives it trouble and ate away some cork that is used in a fuel gauge.
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On Friday, November 13, 2015 at 12:08:48 PM UTC-6, Ralph Mowery wrote:

It doesn't attack the cork but the shellac used to seal it. (cork is used universally to seal alcoholic beverages).
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On Fri, 13 Nov 2015 13:10:49 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

There has been ethanol in gas for 2 decades, I see that as a manufacturing defect.

I am not surprised Henry didn't even want people drinking ethanol.
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On Fri, 13 Nov 2015 13:10:49 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

from absorbing fuel.
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For over winter, I just leave whatever was in the tank. It doesn't matter. I'm almost 70, been using mowers since I was 16. No problems yet.
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

I do the same. Never a problem. Mower starts right up next season.
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On 11/13/2015 09:54 AM, Frank Thompson wrote:

If using E10 gasoline, drain it out completely. E10 is evil stuff.
If you are using real gasoline, just add some Sta-Bil.
http://pure-gas.org/
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Frank,

It's more about how long the gas will sit than how full the tank is.
I've never done anything special with my mower gas, and have never had a problem. But it really only sits unused about 4-5 months at most.
I don't use the snowblower as often, but I do start it up and let it run a few times a year, even if I'm not using it for snow. So far, no problems.
My chainsaw is a different matter. Whenever possible I like to run the engine till it is out of gas. But, there have been times I've left gas in it for a long time without running it. Eventually, the stale gas gummed up the carburetor and I had to have it serviced.
Last year I started adding fuel stabilizer every time I refill the gas cans. No problems so far, but will have to see how things work out long term.
These days I am trying to switch to battery power for equipment that I don't use often. I have a 56V Ego string trimmer and a 56V Ego leaf blower that both work great. Plenty of power and run time, and no gas/oil to mix and store. Our property is too big to go electric for the mower and chainsaw, otherwise I would choose battery power for those too.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Fri, 13 Nov 2015 16:24:20 -0000 (UTC), HerHusband

I like to store small engine tanks dry. On things like the chain saw. I try to run it dry but if I cant, I dump the gas out and use it somewhere else like my truck. A little oil won't hurt anything in a 10-15 gallon tank of gas. I dump out the premix too if I am not going to use it right away. I try to only mix what I need.
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On Fri, 13 Nov 2015 06:54:45 -0800 (PST), Frank Thompson

moisture from condensation because there is no fuel. Full because fuel cannot absorb moisture from condensation because there is no air.
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