Small engine...starts with starter fluid, but won't keep running

It's in good condition, and ran fine last time I tried, but it's on a Ex-cell VR2400 Pressure washer, and hasn't been started for two seasons. Now that I need it, can't keep it running. Won't even "hit" without starter fluid. Any thoughts about what to do about this problem? It's a 6.0 HP engine. Not worn - I'd be surprised if it has more than 20 life-time hours on the machine. AND, I did put it to bed two years ago with stablizer - but haven't looked at it since.
I know, It's my fault for not running it last season, but what can I do about it now?
As long as I give it a spurt of starter fluid every 5 to 10 seconds, it runs, but won't run on the (fresh) gasoline we put in it at all.
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I've had no experience with fuel stabilizers. I run my engines dry at the end of the season, and remove all fuel from the tank. I would bet almost anything that the fuel system is clogged up. Get out the carb cleaner, pipe cleaners, brushes, etc., etc, and clean the fuel system from one end to the other. Start with the fuel bowl on the carburetor.
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One addition, torch tip cleaners sold at welding supply shops are excellent for cleaning passages. Use care with the jets though, those are little flexible files, and you can file jets bigger if not careful.
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Ditto on what the other gentlemen said... your carberator is plugged up. You might look for a carb kit online for your engine... they come with all the gaskets you will need when you pull the carb off and clean it properly.
Stabilizer won't stop fuel from drying out in the carb and leaving behind gum/varnish which plugs up the jets. Sometimes some good carb cleaner and an air compressor with a needle blower should do it for you.
Steve Henderson wrote:

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I like the idea of the nozzle cleaner. Had forgotten about that. I use the "E" string salvaged from my daughter's violin...
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On Mon, 28 Aug 2006 22:58:09 GMT, Steve Henderson

BTDT. Darin all the gas from the tank and fuel bowl. Put a few ounces of carb cleaner in it. Remove the plug wire and give it a few pulls. Let it sit for a few hours. Add fresh gas, reconnect plug wire and try again. This should do it. If it doesn't you'll have to disassemble the carb and detail clean it.
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Thanks for everyone's suggestions. I'll try them, and let you know what happens. I know this much... I WILL drain the gas out of all my small engines this fall.
Steve
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Steve, I agree that the carb might be stopped up but there is one more possibility if you find that's not the case. For gas to enter the carb there has to be some type of pumping action. These small gas engines use a rubber type diaphram in the carb to perform this action. If this rubber piece gets stiff it will not pump gas. You are bypassing this by spraying the starter fluid. This is a cheap part and certainally one to check if you don't find a blockage.
J
Steve Henderson wrote:

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I've been using stabilizer for many years and don't have a problem storing equipment over the winter. Stabilizers only good for a few months but cooler temperatures of winter is the best time for this. I don't bother with the lawn equipment but with the motorcycle I try to run at it least a couple of times to get fresher gas into the carbs(4). It evaporates a lot quicker than in the tank.
The heat of summer is going to be the hardest on the mix so problems will occur sooner. Obviously for 2 years you should have emptied the carbs. Don't just drain them though. Run them dry. You want the vacuum of the engine to suck the gas out of the carbs jets and passages. That's where most of the problems occur.
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