Small Engine Repair

I'd love to learn how to fix small engines, but none of my local tech schools offers classes any longer. Are the only courses available online? It's pretty hard to do a hands-on class online.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Find a free dead engine on Craigslist and resurrect it from the dead.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oren wrote:

Too many gaskets and pins for the uninitiated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is only true if you're incapable of reading a book and following instructions.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AZ Nomad wrote:

That would be my suggestion--go to local library and peruse their collection to see what looks like what you might like for your own.
Or use amazon.com if you're not inclined to travel that far...
There are any number of books on the subject to choose from.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The steps are the same for any gas engine: check ignition, check fuel, check compression. Any introductory book will start with how to troubleshoot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

tech
That's what I was gonna say. There's only three things that can go wrong with them ;-)
I bought the Hayne's small engine repair manual. Several years ago I knew almost nothing about small engines. I read the book a couple of times and now I can tear one down, replace a piston, valve, governor gear, whatever in a couple of hours. And they work when I'm done. Except some of the carburators are still a mystery to me. You might be surprised how many parts are interchangeable or substitutable between different manufacturers.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ulysses wrote:

We took the mower to the shop. Their diagnosis was they had to rebuild the carburetor. Of course, that's always the diagnosis. I decided not to tackle it after I took off the air cleaner. The primer was not working, and I couldn't figure out how it was supposed to work. It's as if it had no vacuum.
Maybe I'll find a junk engine and try tearing it apart. There are lots of benefits to having a formalized instruction versus trying to understand a picture or a description. We all learn best in different ways, I guess.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mcp6453 wrote:

Sometimes it is fun to learn by figuring it out yourself, too. More frustrating, for sure, but the reward is worth it.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Google produced the trusted Chilton name on one. Check your library, bookstore or online bookstore.
"Chilton's Guide to Small Engine Repair-Up to 20 Hp"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And, you want hands on? Stay away from spindle bearings or axle grease.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Gaskets maybe, but pins? Not many...you'll find more keys than pins (unless you're talking decks and drives)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Like one poster said.......get a non-running engine and start there. Once you find a fairly common engine (Briggs and Stratton), find the model number and look at the parts diagrams online at no cost. Then try to get it started. If you fail, come back and ask questions here. Hell, many on here may take the time to guide you thru the diagnosis procedures before you try to find the problem blindfolded on your own.
In reality, they are pretty easy to work on. All basic stuff.
Hank <~~~30 years with small engines, mostly dirtbikes and ATV's
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Most libraries should have some good books. Check a few out and see which ones you like then buy the ones you think are best. My brother too a course in it. I rebuilt the family lawnmower when I was 13 from reading his books. I dont think he ever did anything with it except in class. I resurrected a few old engines for go carts but havent touched one in 25 years. A lot of teenage kids I knew overhauled old engines they found in the dump. Its not hard.
JImmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.