Small "Dolly" tire not seated on the rim

Does anyone know any trick to put air in a small tire on a dolly cart or I guess they are also called an appliance cart?
Anyhow, one tire is not seated on the rim, and no matter how much I push on it, it leaks one one side or the other. I even tried a larger compressor than mine, at a gas station where there was more air. I just cant get the tire to expand enough to pop the bead onto the rim.
I guess I have to take it to a tire shop. The tire is good, its just loose on the rim. But I thought I'd ask on here for ideas. Someone locally told me to spray ether in it, and light it. NO THANKS !!! I've seen that done on semi-truck tires, but this small tire might launch in the air. Far too dangerous.
I dont know why they put aired tires on these small carts anyhow. A solid tire would work fine, and be a lot less troublesome.
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Cow,
If I'm following you, you want to mount a tubeless tire on it's rim and inflate it. Wrap some rope around the circumference. Tighten the rope until the tire meets the rim. Inflate
Dave M.
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.. and lots of air - the tires on cheapo wheelbarrows can be a problem this way also .. been there .. John T.
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On 4/22/2016 7:48 AM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

+1. . . and use one of those adapters that clips onto the valve stem (to keep both your hands free - or get an assistant) and while the air is flowing into the unseated tire, shake the tire a bit to allow it to seal and pop the tire bead into position.
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snipped-for-privacy@ameritech.net says...

FWIW, it sometimes helps to take the valve core out which allows more air volume to go through the stem. Once seated reinstall the valve core and inflate to proper pressure.
--
RonNNN

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On Friday, April 22, 2016 at 8:06:52 AM UTC-4, David L. Martel wrote:

+1
with a stick through the rope that you can turn like a tournequet
tightne the rope to squeeze the tire and it will push the bead against the rim
M
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David L. Martel posted for all of us...

+1 Or wrap his cow tail around it.
--
Tekkie

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On Friday, April 22, 2016 at 1:19:00 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

install a tube.
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On 4/22/2016 10:39 AM, bob haller wrote:

I did that and solved the problem. Easier than fighting the rim once or twice a year.
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I agree that a tube is a much better solution. Those small tires never seem to form a good bead seal. But before I stick any money in this, I think I'll just buy some solid tires/wheels.
I have an old cart with solid tires. When I need it. it's ready to be used. This cart is bigger so I would prefer it for certain items, but everytime I want to use it, the tires are flat. I see no advantage for aired tires for this application. On a vehicle, aired tires make a smoother ride, but Im not riding on this cart.
I've been thru this same ordeal with wheelbarrows. The ones with solid tires get used, while the ones with aired tires get me pissed off. I have found solid tire replacements for them.
I have to include garden tractors in this thread. Every spring, all or most of the tires are flat. Then all summer i'd be out there fighting with tires. Because there are no solid tires for them, I have put tubes in them, and I do ride on them, so I suppose it's a smoother ride than would be solid tires if they were available.
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On 4/22/2016 12:17 AM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

of that type with crumpled news paper. Can't remember if that helped.
I wonder if a fill of Great Stuff expanding foam would fill, seat, and all that? You can be field tester, and let us know how it works.
Solid tires or inner tubes likely to be the way to go.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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On Fri, 22 Apr 2016 00:17:18 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Better mileage than solid tires. Up to 49 mpg.

What they do at tire shops to get sidewalls to seat is to put a band around the circumference of the tire and inflate it, so it pushes in the tread and makes the sidewalls flare. You could use a thick rope and use a bar to twist the knot, or even the non-knot, around and around to make the rope left to go around the tire shorter. It might work.
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