Slightly OT Tire Pressure

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On 1/7/2016 11:18 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Having worked in industries that engaged in these practices (as a QC tech in one!), I know that to be the case. "Against which specifications am I checking *this* lot? Ours? Or, someone else's??"

I don't eat cream cheese. Nor the cheese cake that I make. And, there's no guarantee that what it tastes like today (with the vendor du jour) will be the same as what it will taste like next time.
Do you really think they buy their milk from the same dairies each time they bring in a batch to sell?
I make marinara/bolognese sauce in 16 qt batches. It takes ~12-14 hours for me to get an *idea* as to what it will taste like after it WILL HAVE a chance to "sit" for a few days. I sure don't want to drop "random-tomato-product" into the sauce and HOPE that 12 hours later I *think* it will be worth the time and effort expended.
When I moved here, it took me many months to come up with a new Rx for my sauce because the tomato product vendor of choice wasn't available here. That's a lot of wasted effort, cost and "substandard meals"!
Let's assume Kirkland's tomato products are BETTER than the competition! Then, Kirkland decides to stop selling them. Where do I go to purchase them? Do I now have to try all the other brands -- even the OBSCURE ones -- in the hope of rediscovering Kirkland's supplier?
As I said, the "pennies" saved by buying a Kirkland-branded product don't compensate for the risk in time expended using that product!
If Kirkland's TP disappoints me, I can throw it all out and I've only "lost" that "one, disappointing WIPE". If Kirkland's trash bags disappoint me (tear too easily), I've, at most, got one 10G bag of trash to pick up off the floor -- and one box of trash bags to discard. If Kirkland's "plastic cling wrap" disappoints, I walk across the street and borrow some "Saran" wrap until I can buy some at a non-Costco store.
Note that it's not that we're biased against Costco/Kirkland but, rather, against house brands -- that, for the most part, originate to meet a price point, not a "quality point". (You don't really think Costco decided "No one makes toilet paper that is good enough for our high standards! We'll have to offer our own brand in order to meet the needs of our customers!").
So, we don't buy Kroger, Kirkland, TJ's, etc.

So, each time I make something like that, I have to do a "test run" BEFORE the "real event"? And how is that saving me anything??
The Ghiardelli chips have worked fine for years. And, now that Costco no longer carries them, we buy them from Sam's or the local grocers (when on sale, they are cheaper than Costco's were). Buying "brand name" lets us cut the ties to Costco when they can't/won't meet the price point -- without our having to change quality in the products we buy.

I don't recall hearing the "Aldi" name, here. I think the major chains are Whole Foods/Reay's, Fry's, Safeway, Albertson's. There used to be "Abco" but they disappeared.
And, of course, all the various specialty stores that carry products that the chains won't (e.g., we are sorely limited in the brands of asian products that we can purchase at the supermarkets -- even the largest ones).

I long ago decided Hunts tomato products were too "heavy" tasting. I won't use them in any of my Rx's -- even if it means paying a much higher price at a store farther away.
E.g., I needed tomato paste for the batch of sauce I made a few nights ago. Costco carried the S&W ground tomatoes -- but only "kirkland" paste. So, I stopped in at the Albertson's along the route home and made my Contadina purchase, there.
Costco *used* to offer these products. But doesn't. Do I really think their reason was because Contadina's products WEREN'T OF HIGH ENOUGH QUALITY??

It could be Amy is leaving that market. We've been watching availability of "Amy" products (the chili, in particular) at OTHER (operative word!) outlets in the months since TJ's started "having problems with their supplier". We've had no problem obtaining it. Don't see the price point moving (up or down) to suggest problems with profitability, sales volume, etc.
The more likely reason is that TJ's wants a better price point based on THEIR sales and its perceived value to THEM. Just like the coffee flavored candies, canned bean salad, sherry, chocolate covered almonds, nonorganic cauliflower, etc.
Maybe they just can't meet the payment terms. Maybe... ??? Regardless, by NOT being tied to an off-brand product, we can just drive across the street and buy the products that we want THERE!
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On 01/06/2016 02:09 PM, Don Y wrote:

Never saw Copper River but I was buying Bear & Wolf and they went to a Kirkland labeled can. it's still from Trident which owns Bear & Wolf and from visual inspection is the same.
It's a little different than the Walmart house brands that usually say something like 'The manufacturers of Gold Bond Medicated Powder deny all responsibility and knowledge of this crap'.
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On 1/6/2016 2:50 PM, Don Y wrote:

We go to BJ's, similar setup. They have converted a lot of products to their Berkley & Jensen brand. They are identical to the name brand and a little cheaper. I don't hesitate to buy their brand. I've always heard good things about Kirkland too. Have you tried them?
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On 1/6/2016 6:34 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

We don't buy any Kirkland-branded food products (SWMBO will buy their frozen blueberries when fresh are hard to come by; and she turns her nose up when forced to eat them). We used to buy a lot of chicken, there, but went to regular supermarkets after one batch of Kirkland's "solution" to that problem.
Over the years, our Costco purchases have steadily decreased in volume and dollar amount. Typically, toilet paper, Kleenex (SWMBO doesn't like Kirkland's tissues), Philly cream cheese, GM Cheerios (when I am feeling nostalgic), Famous Dave's pickles, name-brand condiments, Fage yogurt, Swift Premium (?) pork tenderloins, S&W crushed tomatoes (we no longer buy tomato paste there because Kirkland has decided they can do it better than the legacy suppliers), Hickman's eggs, etc.
Most baking supplies can be purchased for much less from regular grocers by watching for sales. We pay much less for chicken than we ever did at Costco by tracking sales. We buy Amaretto (for biscotti) in bulk at the holidays for much less than Costco ever sold it (*when* they opted to carry it!). We get bread products for less than Costco sells them by visiting the "factory outlet store" down the road from us.
My attempt at Kirkland-brand bluejeans was very disappointing. I'm now back to Levi's and Wrangler's at virtually the same price (by watching for sales) but better quality.
If Costco went away, our food budget for some items would increase (I'd make far fewer cheesecakes as buying that in 8 oz packages is far too costly) but we wouldn't be stuck trying to find an alternate supplier!
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something and it bent the edge of the rim. I took a new rim to Discount Tire and they removed the old rim and replaced it with the new one, also rotated the tires and put the spare back in the trunk and replaced all the jacking equipment that I had left loose in the trunk. No charge.
One day I was there getting the tires rotated and they fixed a flat for free for another person.
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On 1/6/2016 4:21 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Yes, we have a Discount Tire chain, here (with a store a block away from this Costco) that has similar policies. When we purchased rubber for the last vehicle(s), it was a toss-up on price and benefits between Costco and Discount Tire. We opted for Costco as we interact with those people more often (many of whom recognize us and/or know us by name) and the few bucks the added buying affords us in our annual "rebate".
And, as we are *there* every week (not at the Discount Tire place down the block), it makes this sort of thing (topping off tire pressure) more convenient. The "cost" being a few extra minutes sitting in the car while the tires are topped off BEFORE we go to park the vehicle.
[We don't do it AFTER our shopping as we typically have perishable items that would like to get home ASAP]
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seldom get there. We were a member, but moved about 20 miles away so let it go.
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On 1/6/16 11:16 AM, Don Y wrote:

Actually I was a Costco member for a while some years back-- but once I found out that Jim Sinegal was a co-founder and CEO at the time, I returned my card and got a refund on my membership fee.
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On 1/6/2016 6:47 PM, Wade Garrett wrote:

Who? What?
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I had the same thing over New Years. The little screen with the odometer kept running a message to check tire pressure. The tire shaped orange thing on another part of the instrument panel wasn't enough warning. It was several weeks since I drove my Frontier. All four were a bit low. Aluminum wheels can also cause pressure loss. I guess the aluminum oxidizes breaking the tight seal between tire and rim. I've had it happen a couple times on my car.
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I have no idea of the tire problems, but Aluminum oxidizes (rusts) as soon as it hits air, and then wouldn't the wheels be fully oxidized before the tire was even put on?
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On 01/05/2016 06:43 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The rims I have the studs mounted on don't have the sensors so the yellow light is on all winter. I find it very easy to ignore, but if it really bothers you try about 1/2" of electrical tape.
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I dont know where those sensors are located or how they connect from a rotating tire to a wire???? I never had a car with them, and hope not to ever have one. Just sounds like more worthless shit to cause problems.
However, I'd guess that wherever they connect to a wire, you can probably just ground the wire to turn off the light.
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On Wed, 06 Jan 2016 03:49:41 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

They can be quite handy to have. Tires, especially low profile don't always tell you the actual pressure from appearance and I don't know anyone that checks with a gauge every day. I had one go off on my last car so I added some air. Next day, the tire did not look low, but it was. The light tipped my off. Rather than put in more air I went to the tire guy and he pulled out a big nail.
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Yeah, that's something else I noticed about the low-profile tires. I really don't like them at all. Any opinions as to why manufactures switched to them? I'm guessing they are cheaper.
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CRNG wrote: "Yeah, that's something else I noticed about the low-profile tires. I really don't like them at all. Any opinions as to why manufactures switched to them? I'm guessing they are cheaper. "
#1. Looks
#2. Some handling advantages. Mainly better 0-60 starts.
A disadvantage of lower/wider tires is that they require more aggressive alignment settings than do narrower higher profiles to keep them going in a straight line. Narrow tall tires concentrate more weight in a straight-ahead, which naturally straightens them out from a turn with less Caster angle, for example. They also eat through snow and ice more readily than those fat, tall wagon wheels I see nowadays.
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wrote:

No. they are more expensive. They install them because people think they are "sporty" Big honking "DUB" style rims with low profile tires give you a more "direct" steering feel because the sidewalls don't flex as much (is the theory). The reduced sidewall comliance makes them ride like a plank wagon (is the reality), and any time you hit a pothole at any speed they get to sell you a new tire AND rim because the tire cannot protect the rim.
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On 1/6/2016 5:54 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

+1
Out of the showroom, one tire showed a very slow "loss in pressure". Could have been a defective transducer. But, more likely a rim leak, etc.
Brought car in to dealer ("Hey, YOUR TPMS is telling us the tire is losing pressure; it's not my mishandling of a tire gauge!"). Initial test showed the tire as good. Our insistence caused them to look at it longer. Lady tech was tickled when she found it. Replaced the tire. No problems in the months since then.
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On 01/06/2016 02:49 AM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

Unless you're driving a rather elderly vehicle, it has more computer systems than the moon launch. Ever hear the term 'wireless'?

At least for my car if you can find the module the proper value resistor can be used as a jumper.
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On Wed, 06 Jan 2016 03:49:41 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

It is usually inside the wheel and RF connected to a module in the car.
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