Sliding patio door inside or outside?

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Went to a demo show on installing patio door by a local rep. I'd noticed the sliding panel was on the inside (of the house) and the stationary panel on the outside on the demonstration. I don't remember ever seen the slider on the inside so was the local rep. had it backwards or is this the new way of doing it?
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on 10/17/2007 8:48 PM ** Frank ** said the following:

I had a sliding door that was removed after a sun room was built. I now have 2 sliding doors in the sun room. All 3 sliders were/are on the inside. Don't know if there is a rule about which goes on the inside, but I would rather slide the door into a clear track than into a snow filled track.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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on 10/17/2007 9:00 PM willshak said the following:

Another thing I forgot. When the slider is on the inside, you can stick a piece of broom handle or a piece of wood as a wedge in the track and the door can not be pried open. Having the slider on the outside would not allow that.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Good point. Funny, sliders for the doors outside but inside for the windows for my house. I need to verify this for my other units.
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wrote:

Good point. And every sliding door in every house I've owned has presented me with the option of using the broom handle as an added security measure. FWIW, using standard PVC water pipe works great and is a lot cheaper.
Therefore, I would guess the slider on the inside is the standard convention.
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Pella puts them on the outside. The theory being, if the wind is blowing against the door, the pressure help seal the door to keep air out as opposed to pushing it away from the gasket. Mine has been in for about 10+ years now and I like it a lot.
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Yep, they sure do, and it's the poorest excuse for the dumbest design I've ever seen.
The sliding door on the outside means the screen's on the inside. Crack the door open to let the breeze blow in, then close the screen. By the end of the evening, your screen is full of bugs with no way to close the door without letting all of them in the house.
Stupid...
Pete D.
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Hmmmm, interesting logic. However, I don't think it should be necessary unless the doors are huge and/or excessively flexible.
I have two sets of large sliding doors. They're nothing special -- just what the builder put in when the house was built 17 years ago. Neither one had leaked, even a little bit. And the house is on a hill and both doors face onto a canyon, so they're pretty well exposed to the wind.
The fly screens are crap; I should get some replacements. But the doors look good, slide smoothly, and don't leak (air or water).
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Pella is outside but the screen lets in bugs to the closed section and bugs can come in because you need to open the screen to close the slider
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wrote in message

Ok, I've check all the 8 doors in 4 different cities and all are on the outside with screen outside of everything. Its been like that since 1952 for the oldest house and the newest one is 1981. I like it on the outside like you indicated for positive wind pressure. Maintenance wise its better taking it outside and lay it on the patio rather than inside the house where the hardwood floor could be damaged or over spray from WD40, oil or grease on the carpet. I also think breaking into an outside door is more difficult since you have to go through two doors instead of one.
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On 17 Oct, 21:47, snipped-for-privacy@malch.com (Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

Instead of a wooden stick or PVC pipe, which must be moved into and out of the track each time the door is secured/unsecured, I use two of the push-button locks that came with my Crestline door. They supplied one; I doubled up and put one at the bottom and one at the top. I drilled extra holes in the upper and lower frame so I can open the door about 9" for ventilation with security. I also removed the sill bracket and positioned the lock so that more of the steel shaft extends into the oak sill and top plate.
The lock can be seen at the bottom right of this page:
http://www.crestlinewindows.com/PDFs/crestwood/C.05Sliding_CW_FO.pdf
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willshak wrote:

I agree- the doors here are on the outside, and I hate it. Tracks are always grunged up, and the one that gets used most has a problem with rollers jumping off the rail. I'm big enough to manhandle it back on, but a smaller person could not. (Yeah, I know, I keep meaning to buy a refurb kit and take it apart, but as long as it seals...)
Other thing I hate is, screen is on wrong side. You can't close weather door without opening the screen door all the way- not a trivial concern in mosquito season.
I probably won't have this place long enough to replace them, but would lean heavily toward big-window french doors instead. Downside to those, of course, is lost floor space inside for swing and standing room.
aem sends....
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[snip]

Standard for French doors is out swing . . . ..
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JimR wrote:

Not doubting your word, but the ones I've seen up here in snow country all open in. The only weather doors I see that swing out around here are on small sheds.
aem sends...
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Code is to open in on standard doors, I don't see that French doors would be any different.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

But the doors in all commercial establishments must open outward. Fire regs - a stampede toward the door would trap the people.
As an aside, I would think opening outward for residential doors is equally valid.
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I have seen that statement made before. Oddly, noone has given a cite to prove it.
Harry K
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on 10/19/2007 12:58 PM Harry K said the following:

In places that have such building requirements for public buildings, the doors are supposed to open outwards. Fire, you know.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote in message

Code or no code, all the residential exterior doors I've seen open in. I want to install an exterior French door open out but than the threshold will be reversed and the hinges exposed degrading security. Anyway I talk with a door contractor and he could install with doors open out, so may not be code.
Exterior doors open out in some foreign countries.
My commercial exterior door swings in and out, handicap approved, hidden spring loaded for panel to return to close position, panels could remain open in or out without being latched, heavy duty three point latch with just a flip of the finger, 1/4" thick temper glass, and build like a tank almost intrusion proof. I wish doors made this well for residential use.
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1. I have an 'outswing' for my entry. It does open into a small entry porch though.
2. Doors are built for both in and out swing - your choice.
3. Hinges are not a security problem. Out swing have security hinges and you can make your own by drilling a hole and driving a screw in that engages a matching hole in the othe leaf. Mine has that system, both top and bottom hinges.
As far as security goes, out swing is better than in. You can kick in an in-swing but you have to take out the entire jamb on an outswing.
The out-swing frees up an amazing amount of space inside the room.
Harry K
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