Slider advice


I have a 5x8', pretty thick, plywood base resting on the edges three (maybe four) 2x12 frames. This plywood base has on it a significant load, maybe 200 pounds. I would like to be able to slide the base (and the load) along the support frames - not far, maybe two feet, do my business, then slide the whole shebang back into its original position.
I've pondered various methods and the one that seems the least trouble with the greatest chance of success is some kind of slickery material coating both the frame edges and the underside of the base.
I'm thinking something similar to the stuff we see hawked for the feet of refrigerators and heavy furniture. Whether these sliders actually work, I know not, but assuming they do, what is the material from which they're made, is it available in strips, and where do you get it?
I'm soliciting other possible solutions, too. I've considered: * The material-handling ladder-looking things with scores of little wheels instead of rungs (too expensive) * Mounting a dozen or more furniture wheels one the frame holding up the base (too much trouble) * Attaching a harness to my cat and using a whip (too cruel)
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HeyBub wrote:

Unable to parse your sentences to figure out what you are talking about. Can you post a link to a picture? Is this a one-time move or a recurring thing? First thing that comes to mind is a couple stanley wonderbars and some pieces of pipe. Second thing is four strong guys and carry it, adding handles if needed. Third thing would be a couple of the lifting furniture dolleys (like they move loaded desks with) mounted permanently underneath, with a way to stick the lever in to raise them as needed. There is not going to be a painless way to do this, and if there is going to be a recurring need to move the thing, may as well go through the pain once to do it right.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

I have the same questions Aem has, plus if you do your business and then slide it back, it will really smell bad pretty soon, and may rot the flooor.

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aemeijers wrote:

Picture (end view)
---------- base | | | frames
Frames stationary, base moves in and out of the screen.
Picture (side view)
<== ------------- ==> base XXXXXXX frame (stationary)
It is the boundary where the frame meets the base that needs the low-friction solution.
Sorry about the prose - everybody understands what I'm saying and that's what I'm trying to explain. Things are, however, in such a state that I have to write this with a gun in each hand and a knife in the other. All are still safe, fortunately, except those who drowned in an adjacent bog, while the rest of us wonder how many more goddamn otter skins we'll have to stretch.
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Skids of this type really do work: http://www.installertools.com/cgi-bin/INTstore.pl?user_action ήtail&catalogno=EZ-02-04
I think the bottoms are HDPE plastic - you may already own some. We've moved some tremendous weight (2 tons +) with them on various surfaces - your 200# would be child's play.
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On Sun, 13 Sep 2009 16:01:36 -0500, HeyBub wrote:

I moved a heavy hutch, chest of drawers, dresser using frizbies(sp) under the corners. Once over carpet to remove carpet and back in place on the installed tile. Had a 2x4 cut at 45 degree wedge as lever to lift hutch enough to put frizbies under it.
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HeyBub-
Years ago I had to develop a simple, cheap & easy way to move medium weight items ~150 / 200 lbs along a low production rate assembly line.
We settled on HDPE (high density polyethylene, poor man's teflon) strips screwed (counter sunk screws) to a lineup of workbenches.
Instead of HDPE on the moving sled we used an "indoor outdoor like" product glued, wrapped & tacked to the bottom of the sled.
Dan's suggestion of furniture bottoms will work.
We found short nap carpet on HDPE to be acceptable..... the force to move your object will be measured in 10's of pounds.
We tried HDPE on HDPE but fabrication debris (esp, aluminum drilling chips) would embed in the HDPE surfaces, the carpet was way more forgiving.
cheers Bob
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HeyBub wrote:

heavy? We were faced with moving a full entertainment center when we tore up wall-to-wall carpet to install tile. Only wanted to move the thing once, so we bought two sets of appliance rollers (prob. at HD), four in all. They were placed under each end of the e.c. and under each of the upright dividers. E.c. has the usual large TV, stereo, books, etc. We leave it far enough from the wall that we can reach outlets and all the cables. Clean back there once in a while, as well.
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How about the frames with wheels (and locks) sold for power tools like table saws? Lots of these show up on eBay as salvaged from old ShopSmiths.
Joe
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Joe wrote:

Thanks. I thought about that and figured I'd need about 16 individual wheels (at $3/each from HF) plus the fussing with the installation.
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I suggest that you use UHMW Polyethylene.
This is the most slippery material next to teflon and it's reasonably priced, as plastics go ( between HDPE and delrin in price)
This is a relatively soft material that can withstand 6000 lbs of pressure per square inch, absorbs absolutely no water and won't damage hardwood surfaces.
You can pick up small assortments of it at places like lee Valley, Woodcraft or Busy Bee Tools.
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surplusdealdude wrote:

Cool! Looks like a winner: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p2182&cat=1,110,43466
Better deal: http://www.primelec.com/Everything-Else/Tapes-Adhesives/2-Inch-X-18-Yard-Frosted-p4673601.html
Suggested uses include drawer slides and power tool fences.
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I dont know how durable your setup needs to be but that tape would make me a bit nervous.
I was confused HDPE with UHMW polyethylene....UHMW is what we used on our assembly line.
I would recommend using UHMW strips that are thick enough to attach using screws.
cheers Bob
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How delicate is the whole setup?
Get 4 bottle jacks, jack it up about 6", push it over - BOOM - you moved it about 6". Repeat as required.
Effective...and fun!
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