Sleeve type AC unit -- can this be used in a window.

Hi,
I am moving to a new apartment and am planning on taking my sleeve type AC unit with me. However, there is no wall pass through in my new place.
Is it possible to use a Sleeve type AC (11000 BTU) in a window? Is there any special equipment required, or a website with instructions? I'm a bit clueless here.
Thanks
Meighan
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On Mon, 25 Jun 2007 20:42:47 -0700, mtopolnicki wrote:

It could probably be done if the window is large enough but you would have to do a custom rig job. Go to www.google.com, type in "through the wall air in window" and see if there is some info.
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Yes, you can. And not really a big deal, as long as it is properly secured/sealed. Easiest to put it in so that it "balances" on the ledge, shim as necessary. You can, however, install it so that just the ass barely sticks out (ie, most of the A/C is in the room--noisier for you), or so that most of it is out the window. With most out the window, you'll probably need outside L brackets, or some kind of bracing.
More difficult to put a window unit in a sleeve! The side vents of the window unit must protrude out beyond the back of the sleeve, and you need a cardboard partition on the inside to separate the intake from the cold air. I helped a friend do this, works fine.
If the unit is a few years old, I'm told they have miserable EERs--like 8.0, vs. the new minimum 13s or so. Could be a big diff. in a very hot season, even vs. 10.0. Also make sure of the voltages. Many sleeve units are 220, and if so, make sure you have 220 at the window. I put a sleeve unit in a window, and had to kluge two different hot wires from two diff. outlets to get the 220 req'd.
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Proctologically Violated wrote:

ratings; that 13-SEER minimum rating is for central units. I don't know what the minimum EER is on Room ACs but still see 9.7-EERs' and see none as high as 13-EER. If someone knows, post the minimum EER, and the highest Room AC EER you have seen. I like the performance of my 9.7-EER Room AC, it should be better handling the latent heatload than 12-EER. - udarrell
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On Mon, 25 Jun 2007 20:42:47 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Probably, but it means you can't use the window. IMO, it's easiest if you have outside window sills that are least partly wood. When I did this, with a small AC, I was able to make make a shelf, with a second part that rested on the cement part of the sill, and a board that started just outside the window line, and was nailed to the wooden part of the window sill. By putting in the nails at at least 2 different angles, it's very hard for the lifting effect on the board, if any, to pry the board away from the sill. By leaving the nails sticking out a bit, it's easy to remove the shelf when you move out, and fill the nail holes. (Although in my case I just left the shelf there because it was so useful, and I knew the next tenants were likely to like it. But my situation was unusual. Most ll's want these things out, I think.)
I did all this so that if I lost hold of the AC, or if I pushed it out to far, it would not fall out and land on someone. It didn't require that the window be down to stay in place. My AC was much smaller than yours probably is.
I used another similar shelf to put first a planter and then a charcoal grill just outside my kitchen window. I used the grill dozens of times, but on one occasion, I closed the window when the charcoal lighter was still flaming and I broke the window from the heat. I'm sure this one was a violation of the lease, but the landlord often didn't give heat, so I was annoyed.
Try not to use the accordian plastic things that they oft include to make things easy. Air leakage is inevitable. Cut some wood to measure, plywood or masonite, and caulk around it with something that can be ripped off later.

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Sleeve A/C are inherently less efficient than Window A/C because they vent only from the rear as opposed to top bottom sides and rear. You would probably be better off just buying a new one than moving the old one. Perhaps you could sell the old one to the incoming resident of your current apartment.
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Peace,
BobJ

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On Jun 25, 11:42 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The thru-the-wall units that I came across tended to be noisier than the window units, and were not as energy efficient. Considering the trouble of mounting it to the window and the possibility of it being noisy and costly to operate, I would just get a new window A/C, and eBay the old thru-the-wall unit. The thru-the-wall unit tends to be more expensive and may actually bring you a bit of cash if you sell it.
Jay Chan
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