slab vs basement home

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On Tue, 27 Feb 2007 17:18:57 -0500, "Charles Schuler"

Personally, I'd prefer a house on piers to one on a slab.
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That's not a choice, in most places here. Piers are common here only on the water lots. Gulf, bay, canals, rivers, and so on.
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Thanks for all the pros and cons. Guess I should have mentioned that we will be staying in the Atlanta area. Just moving to another neighborhood . I'd say 30 percent on the homes in our area are slab, so we'll now have some considerations to judge. Thanks again
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What are the up and downsides of

Hi Liz;
I currently own two homes in Va. One is on a slab and the other is on a crawl space. I will probably never buy a home again on a slab. It is too much money to get anything done. With a crawl space you can go under the house and run a cable line to a specific wall very easily. You can do the same with water and sewage. This is much harder on a slab. If you ever need any work done...you will really pay for it if someone has to dig up the concrete to get to a sewage line.
Good Luck Pat
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And have radiant heat tubing in them.
--
Steve Barker




"Goedjn" < snipped-for-privacy@mail.uri.edu> wrote in message
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On Tue, 27 Feb 2007 20:36:27 -0600, "Steve Barker"
The trouble with that is, it's more stuff in the slab that can't be maintained, and it's in the way if you need to go through the slab to get at something underneath.
I'd rather wear slippers.
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To each his own. It's not just a matter of having a warm floor. It is THE heat for the house.
--
Steve Barker




"Goedjn" < snipped-for-privacy@mail.uri.edu> wrote in message
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I'm with the ones who wouldn't live in a slab home. The only advantage is that it is cheaper to build. But long term maintenance can be a real pain. If there are plumbing problems it will cost an arm and a leg and there will be a lot of damage to the interior floors.
Bill Gill
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All right, Edwin- what is your floor system, if not slab or stickbuilt over basement/crawl/piers? Rammed earth? Cave with internal plumbing run along the walls? Bucky Dome with same? Inflatable? Inquiring minds want to know.
It wouldn't bother me living in a SIP or poured-concrete-in-foam-block house with all plumbing, HVAC, electric, etc, exposed on the inside walls. Make changes and upkeep a lot easier, and failure points easier to find.
aem sends...
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I have a raised ranch. Sometimes called a split entry. If you come in the front door, you are in a foyer and have to either go up to the living room or down to the family room. Well, I guess you cold just stand in the foyer but that is not very sociable.
The lower level is a slab. The lower level has a bedroom/office/ whateverroom and bathroom in the front of the house. On the back side is the utility/storage areas of about 500 square feet. The large family room is at one end of the house and in some designs would have been a two car garage, but we have a detached garage instead. When I moved in, the walls in the utility area were unfinished, as is the ceiling. Plumbing to the lower level bath runs across the ceiling, into the finished part and down to the fixtures. The kitchen, another bath, bedrooms are on the upper level. Plumbing for the kitchen and bath are in the ceiling of the utility area making them easily accessible. I have the water filter for the kitchen mounted on the joists in the utility area, right under the sink. Very easy to get at instead of trying to squeeze into a sink cabinet.
The raised ranch is a combination of slab and regular ranch basement construction. You can walk into my family room on the lower level from the driveway. The back of the house is at ground level. The front of the house is graded in such a way that the windows are exposed, as is about a foot of foundation below them. It is stick built on top of a 4' concrete foundation.
In the back of the house I have a deck off of the kitchen. Since the kitchen is on the upper level, the deck is also 8' off the ground. Given the height, I have a shaded patio under the deck too, doubling my outdoor living space. Gas grill up on the deck, wood fire pit right off the patio.
My wife has CHF and cannot take steps very well. With our configuration, it is easy for her to spend the entire day downstairs where there is a refrigerator, microwave, full bath and laundry. She only have to take the steps once a day to go to bed. I could make my office back into a bedroom and even eliminate that.
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Liz,
One issue you may want to consider is with either type of house you want to have storm protection. ANY house should have somewhere where your family can go for an extended time when the weather is turning dangerous. In a basement, everyone can go and sleep there until the danger is gone...it is alot harder to sleep in a closet in a slab house. Considering the destructive power of a tornado (note the latest school disaster), I would consider it to be a requirement in any house I would live in that is in an area prone to tornadoes.
Good luck with the house hunt.
TMT
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Valid point, but . . . .If you live in Florida, you could drown in a basement. Take a look at www.polysteel.com and look for "safe room" and build like that. Personally, I'd rather be in a bunker of some sort without a house collapsed on top of me.
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