Skylight location

Hi,
I'm adding 3 2'x4' skylights to a roof where the slope legnth is about 13' and am unsure as to how far up the roof to put them. In theory the higher thay are the better they would release heat when open but if too high would project most of the light to the wall rather than floor. Floor plan is 21' x 20', all 3 skylights would go on one of the long sides.
Thanks
Nick..
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legnth is about

release heat when

the wall

of the long

Well, without knowing much about skylights, I'd say, based on your seemingly correct observations, that it depends on what you're mostly putting them in for. If it's for the light to enter, put them wherever they would give the best light during the hours the space would be likely to be most occupied. If the purpose is to vent, then the higher the better, but I think there are much better methods to vent hot air. It doesn't seem like they'd be very effective venturi components. Don't forget about outside esthetics, too, especially if they're visible to the public in general.
Regards,
Pop
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Nick wrote:

?? Maximum light will always be directy under them regardless of where they are located. Depending on the size and shape of the chase, you'll get light to each side but less than directly under it. ___________________

Where are the windows in the room? Locate your skylights where you want light.
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dadiOH's dandies v3.0... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico ____________________________
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wrote:

Thanks guys,
Forgot to say the place has cathederal ceilings which I guess makes a difference.
Windows are roughly evenly spaced 2 on each side.
I'm thinking about 2 feet down from the top of the roof.
less than 5% of the whole roof is in public view and for the most part I can't see much of it from my yard either.
Nick..
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Actually you might get better usab le light if projected to the wall, light on the floor illuminates poorly.
I have a skylight that is also a roof access, the light only hits the floor in a thin slice about 2 weeks from soltace, BUT it hits reflecting panels which scatter & reflect the light and give good room illumination without harsh direct sunlight.
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"Nick" wrote in message

You determine where you want the light to fall from the shaft/well, this will help determine where the skylight gets installed. Do not install skylight first and hope the light shines where you want it. You mark out where you want the shaft,cut out the drywall, build the shaft/well, then put nails up through the sheathing in the 4 corners of the shaft for reference for cutting sheathing from above. There is more to it than that, especially if you must header off framing, but that's the basics.
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also, if you keystone the shaft walls, you can spread the light further than the size of the skylight.
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"Charles Spitzer" wrote

than
We call it a flaired shaft/well. I noticed the OP said he had cathedral ceilings in another post. Can still flair the shaft, but would be limited on the flair without getting a funky look.
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