Skylight leak, 2nd post (with pics)

I started removing the wet sheetrock around my skylight to try and find out exactly where the leak is coming from. I found the leak coming from the bottom 2 corners of the skylight. It might be hard to see in the pics, but there is an opening in the corner with what appears to be some yellow caulking inside.
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/qEf7NzJz1Abd7y-uMUGXjA?feat=directlink
I confirmed this by spraying a garden hose on the roof on the bottom corners of the glass, and my son inside confirmed the leak was coming from those 2 gaps in the corners.
So my question is, what are these 2 openings for? I would like to fix the leak before I go ahead and finish the sheetrock. I thought about maybe caulking those 2 openings on the inside, but it is obvious the leak is coming from the outside on the glass. Can the seals be replaced? It is at least 20 years old.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry,here is the complete album
https://picasaweb.google.com/mikerock92/Skylight02?authuser=0&feat=directlink
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/15/2011 9:25 PM, Mikepier wrote:

In the second pic, are those shingles under the frame of the skylight?!!!??? What a mess. Only skylight I've seen installed was on top of a boxy frame with flashing around the frame. Previous one had rotted out and blew away when H'cane Charlie blew through :o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/15/2011 9:18 PM, Mikepier wrote:

That skylight looks awful flush to roof surface, where driven rain or ice dams in winter would get up under it. I wish you had included an establishing shot of the entire skylight from outside, with something in picture to show the scale.
At 20 years, I'd bite the bullet and replace the whole damn thing, including any mushy wood. I'd also reconstruct it so the skylight bubble and gaskets were 6-8 inches above roof surface, so water could never pond against them. I'm no expert, but I understand they now have prefabs that go on as easy as a roof vent, and all you have to do is figure out how to make the tunnel up to them. BTW, regular drywall is a poor choice for the tunnel, in case of any condensation or similar issues. The fancy bathroom drywall, or even heavily sealed plywood (like on a boat) will hold up a lot better.
--
aem sends....

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here are some pics from the outside taken about a year ago.
https://picasaweb.google.com/mikerock92/Skylight?authuser=0&feat=directlink
And yes, those are the old roof shingles its resting on.When the previous owner wanted a new roof, he also added thses skylights, so he, or the contractor, cut a hole in the roof and just rested the skylight on the old shingles, and put the new ones around it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mikepier wrote:

Replace it. The roofing has to be flashed UP around the skylight curband overlapped on itself properly; no way just resting the curb on the roofing will prevent water entering.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Those two openings are most likely scuppers. Kind of odd in a skylight, but that's the only thing they could be if they're part of the skylight's original design and manufacture. Depending on the slope of the roof, and how high the metal cap flashing sits proud of the glass, water would puddle there. Scuppers let the water out so there's no standing water on the skylight. Like I said, never saw that in a skylight before and it's very odd.
Norminn picked up a good one...well, bad for you, but a good observation. Putting the skylight on top of the roof shingles is a hack job any way you cut it. Considering the state of affairs you'd be throwing effort and money at a losing situation, so bite the bullet, yank the skylight and drywall, fix what's wrong, and install a Velux skylight the way it's supposed to be installed and you won't have any more problems.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In my opinion, the only way to do this job right is to tear out the both layers of roof and start from scratch.I don't know if I got a new skylight if it can be installed below the old shingles without damaging the new shingles up there now. My roof is still in good shape with no issues. I would hate to start opening up a can of worms by replacing the skylight, plus money is an issue for me right now.
Is it possible to tear out the old caulk/gasket surrounding the glass window and recaulk or re-seal? Is there a special caulk for skylights or is it statndard caulk?
I know the leak is coming from the seals. If I could somehow just re- seal it, that would solve the leak. And also what if I tried to seal those holes from the inside, would I make matters worse.
Thanks again for all your inputs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Captain, the skylight is dead. Let it go. There's no guarantee that you have only the leaks you think you've identified. From the looks of things I wouldn't be surprised if there is some rotted sheathing. Opening things up will allow you to investigate.
Opening up the two layers of roof is more time-consuming but no more complicated. Assuming you have some extra top layer shingles, or they are available, just unpeel the roof in two layers. Building up the lower layer of shingle is not as critical and you can use new shingles or reusue the ones you pulled.
As far as your question about resealing the skylight - no, It is not possible to reseal the glazing unless you are willing to disassemble the skylight to do it. Goobering caulk (any type) on the skylight will at best be a very short-lived temp fix, and could make things worse in a couple of different ways.
At this point we're in therapy mode. People here are trying to help you get over your relationship with your old, leaky skylight and move on.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agree with the above. And when replacing, consider ones that open with electric motors. I have that type from Velux, which is the brand I would recommed. They've been working perfectly for 17 years now. I open them enough that it was worth the extra money. They also have a rain sensor that closes them with the first couple drops of rain if they happen to be left open when it rains.
I wouldn't go with ones that open manually, as unless they open with a button I think I wouldn't use them much at all. Either motors or else just fixed ones. ones.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Hey, you've already been spoiled by electrically operated self-closing skylights - you no longer can be objective! ;) The first time I installed a Velux with the rain-sensor for a client I realized I wouldn't be doing any more installations with other brands. Velux makes a roof window - Cabrio or something like that - that has a small fold out balcony railing. I'd love to have one of those installed in a house with a steeper roof.
There may be equal or better brands of skylight compared to Velux, but I don't know of any. They're not cheap, but they're quality and the installation is logical and straightforward though not the simplest. The simplest skylights are also called "sieves" or "future leak locations".
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
how old is the roof? if its in doubt AT ALL first replacing the roof would be job one.
at some point patch jobs end up costing more than just do it right do it onc and forget about it......
the skylight has failed, the sheathing is rotted......
timew to start over.
why risk a later roof leak? damaging all your nice new drywall:(
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.