Skylight insulation

We moved in a few years ago and love theold "bubble" 4' X 4' skylights in our family room. The problem, as with all skylights, was that they eventually leak.
We had them replaced with V-Lux flat lenses. Our old skylights also had a makeshift fold-down cover that we could use to keep some cold air out in winter and warm air out in the summer.
Unfortuately, the fold-down covers had to go when they were replaced. Also, the roofing guys (excellent reputation) who replaced the skylights, told us we'd be responsible for doing the interior finish work, which is fine. My question is, before I do that (probably replacing the sheet rock on the interior walls from the ceiling to the lenses, how do I insulate behind those walls?)
Also, how and what do I use to insulate between the top opening studs and the skylight itself? I've heard that expanding foam can do real damage. It seems too big for caulk.
Thanks!
Eric Volk
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There are some expanding foams (polyurethane) that don't expand very much. A good building supply house should have these. This is your best bet but use it sparingly. The more aggressive foams will cause your windows to bind if too much is applied, and it's not hard to do that until you gain some experience using the material.
Boden
ebvolk wrote:

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In the past I have taken loose pieces of that pink fiberglass insulation and loosely pushed it into spaces around windows that I have replaced. Don't jam it in because the insulation looses it effectiveness if all the air is compressed out of it. If I understand the first part of your question correctly, as far as the area between the ceiling and the roof?, there too I would stack layers of thick insulation one on top of the other. Depending on the depth of the light shaft, you may need multiple pieces. Just remember you need to let air circulate under the roof to prevent freeze/thaw problems. There are Styrofoam panels shapes like a squashed u to allow air flow.
Dave
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I just had 3 Velux installed. The interior contractor, who is top-notch, just put R-38 kraft-faced fiberglass stapled to the framing of the light shafts, all the way up to the roof sheathing.
Use a good oil primer, or Benjamin Moore's Vapor Barrier interior latex primer on the drywall. I have 2 lights in my kitchen, so I am concerned about vapor, steam, etc.
You may want to call your building code office. In my area, a permit, and a framing and final inspection are required for skylights, even if no structural changes are made. I was happy to get a permit. Trust me, it's in your best interests.

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