Skil 18V XDrive Cordless Drill

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Any opinions on this drill? Looks like it has a decent torque of 300 in/lbs. and lots of juice.
I know many would not allow Skil into the "big league" of "professional" grade tools, but is this really more myth than reality? What in particular make this drill inferior to Makitas, DeWalts, PCs etc.?
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I don't know the particular drill, but ignorance has never stopped me from giving advice.
I have 18v Ryobi tools and 12v Dewalt tools. The Dewalt are as powerful as the Ryobi and the batteries last as long. They are somewhat lighter (because of the smaller batteries) and I am sure they will last 5 times a long. Use both and you will see what I mean. Of course, the Dewalt cost twice as much, but I wish I could find some sucker to unload the Ryobi on. Well, that's not quite true; I have a number of Homelite garden tools, so I really have to keep the system. I have never used a 18v Dewalt; that must really be something!
Does this answer your question?
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| I don't know the particular drill, but ignorance has never stopped me from | giving advice. | | I have 18v Ryobi tools and 12v Dewalt tools. The Dewalt are as powerful as | the Ryobi and the batteries last as long. They are somewhat lighter | (because of the smaller batteries) and I am sure they will last 5 times a | long.
Interesting this: I heard more than once people complaining about short life of DeWalt's batteries
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300in'lbs out of an 18 volt drill is really pretty bad. My "12 volt" Makita drill has 310 in/lbs with about 50% less battery weight and my Makita 1/4" hex impact driver delivers 1100 in/lbs. I got both with a charger and 2, 2.6 amp batteries for $197.

I think Skil still builds a good worm drive circle saw but that is about it. I compare Skil to Ryobi, and Black & Decker.
What in particular

Lack of Quality and the guts to make it last for years of every day use. I see the drill at Amazon for $89. A good battery should cost you that much. You get what you pay for.
That said, if this is a drill that you need for occasional usage it might be just right.
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| > Any opinions on this drill? Looks like it has a decent torque of 300 | > in/lbs. | > and lots of juice. | | 300in'lbs out of an 18 volt drill is really pretty bad.
300 pounds of torque is plenty, from however many volts it comes from. I am not out to make efficiency test ratings. Besides, if 18V DeWalt delivers 400lbs of torque, is it really that significant? This reminds me of discussions between hair-splitting audiofiles who would obsessively look for amps with lowest possible distortion without realizing that it mattered little (within reasonable limits) in practice.
| My "12 volt" Makita | drill has 310 in/lbs with about 50% less battery weight and my Makita 1/4" | hex impact driver delivers 1100 in/lbs. I got both with a charger and 2, | 2.6 amp batteries for $197.
So here is my question: Within 300lbs torque range, is it not better to go with higher voltage?
| | What in particular | > make this drill inferior to Makitas, DeWalts, PCs etc.? | | Lack of Quality and the guts to make it last for years of every day use.
Sorry, this is too general for me. That's why I asked "in particular"...What aspect of quality? Chuck? I see as much plastic on most of DeWalts. Gears? I think Skil makes them similar to the others, no? They do offer 2 year warranty as compared to DeWalt's one year. I don't know...I think with tools as with cars there is a status symbol. You'll pay twice as much for Mercedes compared to Lexus, despite the tests showing the latter to be a better car.
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Sure 300 is plenty of torque, but why lug around a larger battery pack that weights 50 % more weight for more power.
Besides, if 18V DeWalt delivers

1/3 more significant. Do you see a difference between a 75 and a 100 watt light bulb when comparing the light brightness?

Not necessirially. All thing s being equal higher voltage equates to longer run time providing battery amperage is equal. I read a test comparison on 14.4 volt drills and the Skil has a battery that was rated at 1.2 amp. That is the type number you would have expected 12 to 14 years ago. Most all the drill inthe test had 2.0 amp or better. Some were 3.0 amp. Also with higher voltage you carry more weight. This may not seem significant if you use the drill for a few holes per month, but used daily or weekly it may get old real fast. Also larger batteries are inherently prone to fail fooner than smaller battery packs. More cells insulating inner cells holds heat and heat is the enemy to a battery.
|

The Skil chuck gets a poor rating in drill tests. The 14.4 volt model started slipping when torque reached 100 in/lbs. The Skil run time was poor compared to others. It out performed Ryobi and Craftsman, but it was behind the other 16 brands. And typically other brand drills produced 50 to al most 100% more torque than the Skil.
I see as much plastic on most of DeWalts. Gears? No plastic gears on a DeWalt. Hitachi uses plastic gears. I

Maybe only in size and appearance. Compare how they work and you will se the diferences.
They do offer 2 year

Hyundai offers 10 years, Honda offers 3 years. Would I choose Hundai over Honda? Noooo. The trugh about the Hyundai warranty is that it is what kept the company from folding in the US. This was strictly marketing strategy.
I don't know...I think with tools

That comparison is more like comparing a Panasonic to a Metabo or Milwaukee. The comparison of Skil to other better name brands is more like comparing a Yugo, Hyundai, or Kia to just about any thing else.
Again you wanted an opinion. You got it. I have been using cordless drills since the late 80's. I have had 3 Makitas, 2 DeWalts, 1 Panasonic. Only the batteries have failed on these drills. Typically the batteries have lasted me 3 to 4 years on average. If you are looking for a cordless that will not see much use or that you plan to possibly replace in a few years the Skil may be right for you. You have to start somewhere and if you have no specific needs or demands start with the Skil and learn. If money were no object I would go with Panasonic again.
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| > | > Any opinions on this drill? Looks like it has a decent torque of 300 | > | > in/lbs. | > | > and lots of juice. | > | | > | 300in'lbs out of an 18 volt drill is really pretty bad. | > | > 300 pounds of torque is plenty, from however many volts it comes from. I | > am | > not out to make efficiency test ratings. | | Sure 300 is plenty of torque, but why lug around a larger battery pack that | weights 50 % more weight for more power. | | Besides, if 18V DeWalt delivers | > 400lbs of torque, is it really that significant? | | 1/3 more significant. Do you see a difference between a 75 and a 100 watt | light bulb when comparing the light brightness?
If 75W bulb is sufficient for my needs, who cares? More to the point, if we agree that 300 pounds of torque is enough for just about any kind of house project, then why pay double for something I won't need?
| | > | > | My "12 volt" Makita | > | drill has 310 in/lbs with about 50% less battery weight and my Makita | > 1/4" | > | hex impact driver delivers 1100 in/lbs. I got both with a charger and | > 2, | > | 2.6 amp batteries for $197. | > | > So here is my question: Within 300lbs torque range, is it not better to go | > with higher voltage? | | Not necessirially. All thing s being equal higher voltage equates to longer | run time providing battery amperage is equal. I read a test comparison on | 14.4 volt drills and the Skil has a battery that was rated at 1.2 amp. That | is the type number you would have expected 12 to 14 years ago. Most all the | drill inthe test had 2.0 amp or better. Some were 3.0 amp. Also with | higher voltage you carry more weight. This may not seem significant if you | use the drill for a few holes per month, but used daily or weekly it may get | old real fast. Also larger batteries are inherently prone to fail fooner | than smaller battery packs. More cells insulating inner cells holds heat | and heat is the enemy to a battery.
For the difference in price, I can get an extra pair if Skil batteries. Sound like a deal to me...
I read somewher that you get most bang for a buck in 9.6 batteries, for the reasons you described.
| | | | > | What in particular | > | > make this drill inferior to Makitas, DeWalts, PCs etc.? | > | | > | Lack of Quality and the guts to make it last for years of every day use. | > | > Sorry, this is too general for me. That's why I asked "in | > particular"...What | > aspect of quality? Chuck? | | The Skil chuck gets a poor rating in drill tests. The 14.4 volt model | started slipping when torque reached 100 in/lbs. The Skil run time was poor | compared to others. It out performed Ryobi and Craftsman, but it was | behind the other 16 brands. And typically other brand drills produced 50 to | al most 100% more torque than the Skil.
I used a 12V Ryobi R10510 to build my 12x16ft deck. Worked like a champ, driving effotlessly hundreds of 2 3/4 inch screws. Bateries died after 5 years, but hey, Ryobi is also classified as el cheapo brand
| | I see as much plastic on most of DeWalts. Gears? No plastic gears on a | DeWalt.
I was talking about a chuck.
| Hitachi uses plastic gears. | I | > think Skil makes them similar to the others, no? | | Maybe only in size and appearance. Compare how they work and you will se | the diferences. | | | They do offer 2 year | > warranty as compared to DeWalt's one year. | | Hyundai offers 10 years, Honda offers 3 years. Would I choose Hundai over | Honda? Noooo.
Really? I know quite a few folks who would choose Hyundai Sonata over Honda Civic given the similar price range. No doubt Honda has better overall reputation, but that doesn't mean every Honda wouold be preferred over every Hyundai.
| Again you wanted an opinion. You got it.
I appreciate it. Thanks.
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You should never drill holes with light bulbs, 75 Watt or otherwise. This is not what they are intended for; I'm quite sure it would void the warranty, and it seems dangerous as well.
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Absolutely. Around the house it should be fine. Don't buy the extra batteries untill you need them and consider having them rebuilt by PrimeCell.

Actualluy I believe in that philosophy also. Untill last December all of my drills have beem 9.6 volt except for a 20 year old 7.2 volt right angle Makita. The power was plenty. I stepped up to a 12 volt Makita so that I could get an Impact driver and a free M force drill for $199 with 2, 2.6 amp batteries and charger.

Some times the batteries will last longer if cycled regularilly. The battery in my 20 year old Makita still takes a charge, it does not last long but I seldom need to make many holes with a right angle drill. Most batteries are totally shot after 6 or 7 years.

Yeah, many people like the warranty. I prefer the reliability. I retired from the automotive industry at 40 and worked for a GM dealer for almost 10 years as parts manager, service sales manager, and parts director at various times. Honda and Toyota are the ones to beat as far as reliability goes.
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Never used the Skil, I have 18v Dewalt. I know from experience that most jobs I do not require the power of this drill. I bought it cause of the set it came in. The drill is big, hard to get into small places and is problematic when trying to do small jobs. Now the saw and sawzall work well and I have no complaints.
After my move I plan on buying a 9.6 volt drill for everyday chores that need a drill. I will retire the 18v for when I need " more power"
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You get what you pay for. If you are going to use it for the home a few times a year OK skill should work. If every day as a Pro it wont last 1/10th the time as Milwaukee, PC, Makita, Bosch etc etc. I still have my 1986 Makita , and it works. Skill make a good worm drive saw, thats it. My last skill drill I broke in 2 days, They do not make a pad sander I cannot blow in 2 days, I went through 10 of them before buying PC that have lasted 15 yrs.
Now Batteries, there are Cheap crap you get in Ryobi, Skill, B&D or good Panasonic or Sanyos that come in Milwaukee, P.C., Makita, ETC etc. Cheap batteries loose charge , run down fast, dont last. My 1986 9.6v Makita pack still gets a bit of use. It is more than gears, it is like comparing a Yugo to an American 3/4 ton truck. Dewalt has a high return rate, and I brought mine back. Again for equipment worth working with every day Milwaukee. Makita, P.C., Bosch, Panasonic, Dewalt.
Skill, B&D, are homeowner, stuff. Ryobi is in the middle. My 9.6v 1986 Makita outdoes a 12v new Ryobi by a long shot.
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That would be a good test. Take 2 drills, put them each in a vise. Take a drill bit, and put each end in each chuck. Power both drills up at the same time, and tape the triggers down.
Sunday! Sunday! Sunday!
It's the battle of the drills spectacular!
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Matt ive seen that test done with P.C. and Milwarkees best AC drills, PC won. My PC takes something like 550 watts
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Well sure, but you have the 880v model!
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Oh yea 18 V 5.5 lb drills. An hour with that is like a day with a 9.6v. That is what gearing is for. Unless you are doing large bit drilling or concrete and sinking 6" bolts it can be a pain in the arm. Everybody advertises Volts, not run time . Volts sell, like horsepower on cars.
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OK for the average homeowner. It is not a pro tool.
To see what makes it inferior, you have to take it a part. Compare the sizes of bearings, motor windings, battery quality. Drilling a hole in a pine board, driving a screw to hang curtain rods, both the cheap and pro tools will perform the same. Install a deck with a few hundred screws every week and you will soon see the difference.
The variable speed control is usually more accurate and easier to control on the higher quality tools, the batteries will usually last longer between cages, and take more charges before the inevitable failure. Better drill have electric brakes, better more durable clutches. This won't show up in an hour of use, but twenty or fifty hours later, the cheap drill is in the trash, the prod drill is just getting broken in.
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| > Any opinions on this drill? Looks like it has a decent torque of 300 | > in/lbs. | > and lots of juice. | > | > I know many would not allow Skil into the "big league" of "professional" | > grade tools, but is this really more myth than reality? What in particular | > make this drill inferior to Makitas, DeWalts, PCs etc.? | | OK for the average homeowner. It is not a pro tool.
Why? Have you inspected the components of the subject drill?
| | To see what makes it inferior, you have to take it a part. Compare the | sizes of bearings, motor windings, battery quality. Drilling a hole in a | pine board, driving a screw to hang curtain rods, both the cheap and pro | tools will perform the same. Install a deck with a few hundred screws every | week and you will soon see the difference.
As I said in my previous post, I used 12V Ryobi R10510, which is nowhere classified as a pro tool, for buildng a sizeable 12x16 deck, and drove hundreds of long screws w/o any problem.
| | The variable speed control is usually more accurate and easier to control on | the higher quality tools, the batteries will usually last longer between | cages, and take more charges before the inevitable failure. Better drill | have electric brakes, better more durable clutches. This won't show up in | an hour of use, but twenty or fifty hours later, the cheap drill is in the | trash, the prod drill is just getting broken in. |
OK, so all in all, durability is what makes pro tool better? Fair enough. If I am in a market for a tool that will do everything that pro tool will, and will use it for 2-3 projects a year (basement finishing, kitchen remodelling, cabinetry etc.), would you say that Skil 18V is a good choice?
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Mostly but better drills in lower voltages have the same or better run time and power as higher voltage cheaper drills also.
Fair enough. If

Given those circumstances, that would probably be a decent choice.
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So get the dam Skill if that what you want, If it lasts just one or 2 years so what you were told. Maybe in your next 20 years of remodeling you will need alot more, Maybe not.
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