Sistering 2x4's on Frame


Follow-up question on my garage conversion project.
I am converting my garage into a family room. Existing garage has a 2x4 frame. Existing foundation sticks out several inches further than existing frame. Wife doesn't want a shelf or ledge on a particular side. She wants the drywall to run continuous floor to ceiling.
To make up this distance between the existing frame and the foundation, I want to "sister" a 2x4 onto the existing 2x4 joice, thus making a 2x8.
What is the correct method for "sistering" 2x4's together like this? How would I nail them together?
Thanks,
Chris
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I meant wall stud, not joist.
If I sister a 2x6 next to the existing 2x4 frame (nailing into the 2" overlap), then won't my 16"OC be messed up?
Thanks
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wrldruler wrote:

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On 8/24/2008 4:20 PM wrldruler spake thus:

Rather than a "joice" (I assume you meant to type "joist"), sounds like you're talking about the wall studs and the bottom and top plates, right?
Normally when sistering, you double the *thickness* of the framing member, not the width. For instance, with 2x4s, you'd nail new 2x4s onto the flat side, making 4x4s. Sounds like you're talking about making a double wall. I suppose this could be done, but it seems you'd need to connect the two sets of 2x4s together to make a (virtual) 2x8, and I'm not sure whether this can be done legally, or how one would do it.
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Just build another 2" x 4" wall in front of the existing. You can tie the two walls together with small blocks (2" x 4" x 7") from stud to stud. The new wall will not be load bearing. It will only need to support the weight of the drywall. You could use metal studs for this.
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John has given you the correct answer. This really isn't sistering.
If you live in a really cold climate consider not aligning the studs and insulate the exterior portion with unfaced insulation before you build the new wall. Then used faced insulation on the new stud wall. This will allow you to have have something like R-25 in the exterior walls with no direct wood in contact with the outside sheathing. Many house were built that way in the last "energy crisis".
It also allows you to correct any OC problems for the interior finish.
Colbyt
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method of reducing noise.
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John,
I like your "double wall" solution. I'm guessing here that he did not plan to install a floor but just cover up the concrete or asphalt. He should, I think, consider a floor. The room will be much nicer with a floor and the floor will hide the foundation shelf.
Dave M.
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"David L. Martel" wrote

Actually he mentioned a floor. A 2-3 inch depth so I took it as a standard framing then plywood and probably tile or carpet over it.
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"wrldruler" wrote

Hehe tell her to help make it then. (evil grin). Yeah I know, she's not gonna right?

Wording a wee bit wrong but I know what you mean. I'd use metal plates that span the 2 after nailing them together. Dont get cheap with the nails of the metal plates. You want something really solid so a metal plate every 6 inches on both sides might be a good investment. (12 would probably work but I'd go overkill here as they are cheap).
This will have one advantage. You can make some really nice recessed bookshelves if you want to, with this sort of wall as it will be deeper.
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Also point out that the windows will be set in a deep tunnel. She may not like that look.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:> >

Andy writes: It occurred to me that might be a good opportunity for "window seats" giving a "stepped" look to the increased depth.
And the recessed bookcase idea is a very good one. If you do this when you are building, it isn't much of a problem. I did this when I put a wall where a door used to be, and it worked out well.
Also you might consider recessed appliances, such as a TV, microwave, or even a Murphy bed.....
This double wall thing opens up a lot of imaginative options.......
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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"Andy" wrote

He'd have to actually bring the bottom part out a fair amount to get that I think? I dont have the origional but my impression was a 2-3 inch differential.

I loved it in that one apartment!

True! Making it deeper with an added 2x4 means he can have a suitable shelf depth of about 6 inches with ease. Nice little display case or smaller paperbacks would work well. I'd sort of match them in placement much like one would do a window (he mentioned only putting windows on the garage door portion).
Reasonable guess is there isnt a cinderblock edge up on the side attached to the house so it's either the long exterior wall he''s thinking to bring out (will give him that shelf depth to make it more usable), or the back shorter section where he's planned a patio door.
I'd be interested in his patio door plans and how he's going to deal with the probably load bearing cinderblocks back there to get the patio door in?
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"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote

Actually if I follow him right, the only windows go where the garage door is now. That wall wont have the cinderblocking so a non-issue. Now the back wall that gets the patio door? That I gather does and he'll have to take that cinderblocking down so it's a level to the outside situation. They had to do that here with the sunroom (code issue they said). A 6 inch or so small block sill had to come out.
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