sink shutoff

Is it possible to fix a leaking shutoff valve by wrapping teflon tape around the pipe, or by using packing string? The shutoff under the kitchen sink is leaking. Do you wrap the string/tape and then start to close the valve so part of the string/tape stays in behind the packing nut? Hope i am being clear in my questions. Thanks very much. Patt
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No. It has to be disassembled. You have to shut off the main water supply. It's not difficult, but it would probably be best if you watched someone do the job first. If that's not possible, go to a REAL HARDWARE STORE or a plumbing supply place. Using parts from the bins, they can show you exactly what you need to do.

around
is
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On Tue, 13 Jul 2004 13:47:41 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
No it doesn't.
Have a nice week...
Trent
What do you call a smart blonde? A golden retriever.
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wrote:

Half correct. If she need to repack the thing, it needs to be disassembled. Maybe it just needs a little twist with a wrench, but maybe not. Depends on where it's leaking from.
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On Tue, 13 Jul 2004 18:51:28 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

No it doesn't. It can be repacked (most times...not always) just by taking the nut off and packing it.
Have a nice week...
Trent
What do you call a smart blonde? A golden retriever.
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wrote:

disassembled.
Oh fer cripes sake. To someone who's never done it before, that means a certain amount of DISASSEMBLY. The person who asked the question was hoping to get away with wrapping teflon tape around the shaft of the faucet or some such nonsense. Anything beyond that is DISASSEMBLY.
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On Wed, 14 Jul 2004 02:13:48 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

My apologizies...yer correct.
If you call unscrewing the nut as 'disassembly', then yer correct. You can't pack the stem without unscrewing the nut from the housing.
I guess I was looking at what you said here...

and got short sighted. You don't need to shut off the main water supply, of course.
I also wrote that this is not something the OP should attempt.
My definition of 'disassembly' is to take out the stem...not just to loosen the packing nut. I guess it was a matter of definition.
Have a nice week...
Trent
What do you call a smart blonde? A golden retriever.
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wrote:

hoping
some
supply.
When a first-timer does it, the odds are high that he/she may disassemble more than necessary. So, shutting off the water supply may be a good thing. Besides, it seems like a fair percentage of people here just bought their first house. It's good to know where the main shutoff is.
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On Wed, 14 Jul 2004 03:01:29 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

I wholeheartedly agree.
Have a nice week...
Trent
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<< Is it possible to fix a leaking shutoff valve by wrapping teflon tape around the pipe, or by using packing string? >>
Highly unlikely, don't even attempt it. Do the sensible thing and replace the valve with a modern quarter turn ball valve. If this involves any techniques like soldering that you are not comfortable with, hire a plumber. While you're at it, if there is a similar valve under the sink for the other water service replace it as well and save the second service call when it starts leaking, too. Good luck,
Joe
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I think he is talking about a leak where the shutoff attaches to the pipe. Many plumbers make their joints very loose. A tiny turn of a wrench might stop the leak.

around
the
techniques
you're
service
leaking,
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Yes...but I wouldn't suggest it.

Try tightening the packing nut a little. Often, that will solve the problem.
Have a nice week...
Trent
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