Sink of DEATH!

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Alright folks, so here's the latest chapter with my sink.
I didn't try the soda because the nut is UNDER the sink. I DID try the liquid wrench and it did loosen things up... HOWEVER, now when I turn the nut, the shank and flange turn too. In other words, the nut is still FUSED to the shank (cylinder... whatever it's called).
I can't figure out a way to stabilize both of them so I can turn the nut.
Any more suggestions before I lose the rest of my hair and call the looney bin to come pick me up?
Thanks! Jey
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On 29 Nov 2003, Jey Gifford wrote:

If you do my method -- totally "gut" the part that's exposed *above* the sink and take it down to bare pipe skeleton -- you may be able to lasso the spinning shank from above with maybe a pair of ViceGrips? You'll need a helper "Just stand up here and hold this while I climb under the sink for the 3000th time..." but that might do it.

a) call a plumber
b1) get out the sledgehammer (you'll enjoy it, trust me!) b2) buy a new sink.
--
Baisez-les s'ils ne peuvent pas prendre une plaisanterie
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ive had goodluck getting a stubborn fixture off by taking an angle grinder to it. chop away, but be careful and try not to scratch the sink. the pieces should just fall right off.
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On 29 Nov 2003, SoCalMike wrote:

Yep, it *can* be done from above, as long as you realize you're going to just flat out destroy it. A couple layers of masking tape in the attack zone helps. It won't stop you from doing any *real* damage, but seeing the shreds fly might serve as a warning that you're getting too close.
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Baisez-les s'ils ne peuvent pas prendre une plaisanterie
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Buy the wrench that goes in the drain opening to hold it still. -- Tom
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On 29 Nov 2003 15:08:06 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@soboba.net (Jey Gifford) wrote:

Just grab hold of the threaded part near its end...with a pair of pliers...and then turn the nut.
Recapping...hopefully...lol...
At this point, you should have all the supply lines off. Where the supply line goes into that threaded outlet, it'll be hollow there, of course. Just stick a pair of needle-hose channel locks in there...to keep it from turning. Then turn the nut.
If its a 2-handle faucet, you might be able to hold it still from the top side. Take out the faucet stem from the top.
I still suggest doing what Jim said, though...concentrate on destroying that nut...either with a drill...like he said...or with a hack saw blade.
Do you know how many days its been since yer original post?! lol
Hell...pay for the air fare...and Jim & I will come out an do it FOR ya! lol
Wishing you and yours a happy Thanksgiving season...
Trent
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Well, guys and gals... Good news!
A mere 10 days after first taking on the task of removing the old fixture, and it's finally done!
I had tried beating the snot out of the top flange, and While it relieved much stress, it didn't work so great to loosen it up.
I doused the fixture with 'liquid wrench' and finally got the stupid thing to move a little, but then it was simply spinning the entire assembly...
SOOOOOOO... A buddy of mine that's got a SUPER KUNG FU GRIP grabbed the top flange with his pliers and I got under the sink with my basin wrench. Then, after about 1/2 hour of struggling, IT BUDGED!!!
Halleluiah!
Thanks again all for your helpful info!
MOST SINCERELY, Jey
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On 3 Dec 2003 15:09:36 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@soboba.net (Jey Gifford) wrote:

Glad you got it off, but I cant believe that no one on here mentioned the EASY way. REMOVE the frikkin sink from the wall. Unless it's some oddball sink, or built into the wall type, most sinks (especially the older ones) are simply hung onto a bracket screwed to the wall. Remove the two water lines, disconnect the drain nut at the bottom of the tail piece, and simply lift the sink off the wall. Now, flip it over onto an old throw rug, and use your pipe wrenches and vice grips and penetrating lube. If that dont work, a sawsall or hacksaw will slice the nut, as will an angle grinder. The object is to remove the sink so you have room to work.
I am a retired plumber, and this is how we did it.
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fit under much of anything, especially a sink. Besides it's so much easier to work on the sink with it sitting on the floor.
Dave
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Removing the sink is of course the good way, but you can cut the flange nut off with a dremel tool and a suitable bit or cutoff wheel--this lets you work in close quarters. If the nut is white metal (diecast) or brass, then a carbide router-type bit goes thru it like butter. Anyway, that's how I did it once long ago, and it wasn't really all that ugly a job.
(Jey Gifford) wrote:

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On Sat, 13 Dec 2003 23:13:58 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@usenet.com wrote:

Wrong kind of sink.
And, even with the kind yer talkin' about, most times the sink is caulked at the wall. Tryin' to remove the sink can often cause all kindsa problems.
Wishing you and yours a happy holiday season...
Trent
Proud member of the Roy Rogers fan club!
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