sink depth?

I shopping for a new kitchen sink. There are lots of sink depths, I have a 7.5" now. What limits the sink depth? Could I get a 9.5" Does the drain in the wall have something to do with it?
Thanks,
Jeff
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jeff wrote:

You bet. Even more so if you plan to have a disposal in it.
Have a look at the present installation. Then imagine hacking 2" off the sink drain tailpiece. Will it work?
If you don't have a disposal now but plan to add one, you need even more height difference.
Jim
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jeff wrote:

You have a drain pipe coming out from the wall. You have a trap from the bottom of the sink to the wall pipe.
The bottom of the sink must be higher than the wall pipe for it to drain.
If the deeper sink has the bottom of the sink below the wall pipe you would need to get the wall pipe relocated or raise the counter level of the sink unit.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Speedy Jim addressed the plumbing issues. I'd like to repeat something my kitchen designer said to me, which is that deeper sinks are less ergonomic. If you think about, when the counters are at a comfortable working height, you have to bend over to work on the bottom of the sink, since it is lower. A deeper sink just exacerbates this. So my kitchen designer's suggestion was to avoid the very deep sinks and to get a very tall faucet.
Cheers, Wayne
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
For the average person, deep sinks aren't necessary. Get a standard sink and then get a Moen 7345 Legend Riser Faucet. It raises and lowers as you need it. We've had one for 20 years without any problem. http://www.moen.com/browsecatalog/catalog/details.cfm?stype Κtegory&ptype=w&product91&category4&finishD&crow&details=product&skus45

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"For the average person, deep sinks aren't necessary. Get a standard sink and then get a Moen 7345 Legend Riser Faucet. It raises and lowers as you need it. We've had one for 20 years without any problem"
I just switched to a deep sink last year and would never go back to a regular sink. Unless you are short, the depth works out fine, no ergonomic issues. And for once I can use the sink sprayer without worrying about blow back. It's great for washing large items. Another feature to look for is having the drains located in the rear of the sink. This gives you more open work area on the floor of the sink, without having to block the drain or have stuff fall into it. I chose the Kohler Marsala, which has two bowls, split in size about 60/40. I think that works out best, as it gives you one big bowl and one that is available for collanders or a backup. The Marsala also is a single faucet model, with the faucet going where the divider is. That allows both bowls to go further back, where you normally would have the back area for the faucets. This gives you another 2" or so of bowl front to back.
Regarding issues with drain height alignment, all the sink manufactureres have drawings and specs online so you can figure out the range of waste pipe heights it will work with. I replaced my std sink with a deep bowl one plus disposal with no problems at all.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"For the average person, deep sinks aren't necessary. Get a standard sink and then get a Moen 7345 Legend Riser Faucet. It raises and lowers as you need it. We've had one for 20 years without any problem"
They may not be neccesary but IMO, they are a big plus. I just switched to a deep sink last year and would never go back to a regular sink. Unless you are short, the depth works out fine, no ergonomic issues. And for once I can use the sink sprayer without worrying about blow back. It's great for washing large items. Another feature to look for is having the drains located in the rear of the sink. This gives you more open work area on the floor of the sink, without having to block the drain or have stuff fall into it. I chose the Kohler Marsala, which has two bowls, split in size about 60/40. I think that works out best, as it gives you one big bowl and one that is available for collanders or a backup. The Marsala also is a single faucet model, with the faucet going where the divider is. That allows both bowls to go further back, where you normally would have the back area for the faucets. This gives you another 2" or so of bowl front to back.
Regarding issues with drain height alignment, all the sink manufactureres have drawings and specs online so you can figure out the range of waste pipe heights it will work with. I replaced my std sink with a deep bowl one plus disposal with no problems at all.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"For the average person, deep sinks aren't necessary. Get a standard sink and then get a Moen 7345 Legend Riser Faucet. It raises and lowers as you need it. We've had one for 20 years without any problem"
They may not be neccesary but IMO, they are a big plus. I just switched to a deep sink last year and would never go back to a regular sink. Unless you are short, the depth works out fine, no ergonomic issues. And for once I can use the sink sprayer without worrying about blow back. It's great for washing large items. Another feature to look for is having the drains located in the rear of the sink. This gives you more open work area on the floor of the sink, without having to block the drain or have stuff fall into it. I chose the Kohler Marsala, which has two bowls, split in size about 60/40. I think that works out best, as it gives you one big bowl and one that is available for collanders or a backup. The Marsala also is a single faucet model, with the faucet going where the divider is. That allows both bowls to go further back, where you normally would have the back area for the faucets. This gives you another 2" or so of bowl front to back.
Regarding issues with drain height alignment, all the sink manufactureres have drawings and specs online so you can figure out the range of waste pipe heights it will work with. I replaced my std sink with a deep bowl one plus disposal with no problems at all.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"For the average person, deep sinks aren't necessary. Get a standard sink and then get a Moen 7345 Legend Riser Faucet. It raises and lowers as you need it. We've had one for 20 years without any problem"
They may not be neccesary but IMO, they are a big plus. I just switched to a deep sink last year and would never go back to a regular sink. Unless you are short, the depth works out fine, no ergonomic issues. And for once I can use the sink sprayer without worrying about blow back. It's great for washing large items. Another feature to look for is having the drains located in the rear of the sink. This gives you more open work area on the floor of the sink, without having to block the drain or have stuff fall into it. I chose the Kohler Marsala, which has two bowls, split in size about 60/40. I think that works out best, as it gives you one big bowl and one that is available for collanders or a backup. The Marsala also is a single faucet model, with the faucet going where the divider is. That allows both bowls to go further back, where you normally would have the back area for the faucets. This gives you another 2" or so of bowl front to back.
Regarding issues with drain height alignment, all the sink manufactureres have drawings and specs online so you can figure out the range of waste pipe heights it will work with. I replaced my std sink with a deep bowl one plus disposal with no problems at all.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Interesting comments about sinks .... I measured and I can use about any depth sink. I like the idea of the drains in the back. My carpenter thinks we should go with stainless steel, but my wife wanted a cast iron sink. It looks to me that stainless might hold up better, although they scratch up fast.
Jeff
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net says...

Who do you live with? .... Your wife or the carpenter?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
We bought an excellent quality stainless steel sink 20 years ago. My wife takes great care of it, and has not scratched it, however she did drop something once which put a dent in it. A chip in a cast iron sink finish can be repaired, but not stainless. Something to consider.

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Compromise on soapstone.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon 09 Jan 2006 07:33:55p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Jeff?

Over the years I've had several of both. I will never own another stainless steel sink. A royal PITA.
--
Wayne Boatwright *Ώ*
__________________________________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jeff wrote:

I have to disagree with others who warn against a deep sink. When I tiled my counter top 3 years ago, I took out the crap that was in there and went with a nice since 10.5" sink, AND a Grohe gooseneck style faucet where the head pulls out. It's great being able to fill deep pots, fill 5 gallon buckets, and pile stuff into the sink when necessary. It is a bit more cramped under the counter, but well worth it. I'm no basketball player at 5'9" either.
If you're a coffee/tee/hot chocolate drinker, maybe even think of installing an instant hot water dispenser. They're awesome!
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.