SIMPLE electrical job. Cost via electrician? chg direct-wire to plug & socket

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Well, I grew up in Texas (40's, 50's), and we had forced hot air (no built-in AC).
The hot, dry air would blow in at the top of the room, and exit through the botom.
The blowing force wasn't enough to keep the whole room stirred up, so the hot air stayed in the top part of the room.
OK enonugh, I guess, if you were lying down, but not in any way if you were standing up, with your head (ie mouth, nose) up in that extra hot, extra dry air.
Myself, I sure prefer steam heat via those old clanking RADIATORS. Wonderful things.
David
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On Sat, 11 Feb 2012 20:12:29 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

Blowing in at the top was the problem. Heat rises, so you feed the hot air in at the bottom and take it off, ideally, farther up. In general practice, the "cold air return" is often also at floor level.

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Well, with the forced hot air and zero supplied radiation, the air had to be pretty warm. Thus low relative humidity.
With radiator, you could have window (partly or wholly) open, thus air in room cooler (thus higher relative humidity than with forced hot air), and yet if in direct line to radiator, your body kept warm that way.
--
Anyway, seems that lots of people, even in the north, are happy
with forced hot air.
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On Feb 14, 1:46 am, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

So, you still think it's a huge expense to install an inlet and Lockkit kit for that generator on your panel so you could power not just the furnace, but whatever else you want in the house?
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On Tue, 14 Feb 2012 06:46:16 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

Very wastefull having the window open letting cold air in - but what it DID do is give you "forced air heat" because the air flowing over the rad was heated and circulated. However, that gives you a VERY DRY house. The cold air cannot hold very much humidity at all - so if the RH of the outside air at -10C was 99%, when it warmed up to 20C in the house the RH would be something like 15%. If the RH outside at -10 was 50%, it would only be 7.7%
The secret to keeping relative humidity up in winter is to limit the air changes - keeping humidity in and dry air out. If humidity gets too high a small amount of ventilation can remedy it very quickly and effectively as the humidity is absorbed into the dry air - virtually "sucking it out of the house".
If you (not necessarily the OP) doubt my numbers (and someone WILL dissagree with me - absolutely unavoidable fact of life,) see: http://www.lenntech.com/calculators/humidity/relative-humidity.htm .
And no, I didn't google it first - and yes I do understand it.

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On Mon, 6 Feb 2012 20:32:13 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

Hot air heat has been around a long time, and works in all climates. I grew up with hot water radiators and thought them best. Mostly because I always noticed the furnace going on in houses with hot air. Hot water is dead quiet comparatively. Now that I have a house with hot air I wouldn't have it otherwise. No radiators getting in the way, and no window AC units blocking the light. No hanging water tubs on radiators to humidify when its dry. I got used to the furnace on/off cycle in about a week, and don't even notice it any more. If it cycles right, the heat is probably more even than hot water radiators, which are slow to respond to temp changes.
--Vic
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...

"Wall wart". I tried using that term with an electrician. Had no idea what I was talking about. (I thought it was a universally used term.)

I bought a Radio Shack VOM (5" high, 4 wide, maybe 1.3 thick) back in the 60's. Beautiful -- works like a charm. Still the best one I have -- *way* better than these new electronic ones.
The absolute crap RS has been selling for the last, what, 20 years?, what absolute garbage. (At least the stuff with the Radio Shack label.)
NO WONDER they seem to be going under.
Wait -- let me go do a wikipedia on them...
Here's the table of contents for the wikipedia article:
Contents [hide] 1 History 1.1 The first 40 years 1.2 Tandy Corporation 1.3 RadioShack Corporation 1.4 "Fix 1500" initiative 1.5 CEO résumé scandal 1.6 New strategy 1.7 Corporate layoffs 1.8 PointMobl 1.9 Customer relations 2 International operations 2.1 Operations in Canada 2.1.1 Pre-2005 2.1.2 Post-2005 2.2 Operations in Australia 2.3 Operations in France 2.4 Operations in Belgium 3 Other operations 3.1 Corporate citizenship 3.2 RadioShack and other retailer partnerships 3.3 RadioShack cycling team 4 Corporate headquarters 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External links
I was looking for an LBO or something, but didn't see one.
But I did see this:
| Customer relations | | RadioShack and the Better Business Bureau of Fort Worth, Texas | met on April 23, 2009 to discuss the condition of their file and | the number of unanswered and unresolved complaints. At this time | RadioShack had the grade of "F" and was not listed as a BBB | Accredited business. The company is now working on a plan of | action to address the existing and future customer service | issues. Part of this plan is already visible in stores which are | now required to post a sign with the District Manager's name and | the question "How Are We Doing?" The sign also includes a direct | toll-free number to the district office for an area and every | office has received a unique phone number. RadioShackHelp.com has | also been created as another portal for customers to resolve | their issues through the internet. As of May 29, 2009, the BBB | has upgraded RadioShack from an "F" to a "C-" rating.[16]
Good ole WIKIPEDIA! What an amazing site! Math, physics, history, literature, you name it, it's there, and GOOD, too. (maybe not for some "controversial" subjects (Israel v Palestineans?) where it'd be hacked every 10 minutes!)
About RS: Suppose they just went back to QUALITY, QUALITY, QUALITY, at a decent price. I'd sure like that!
(No more "radio row" (Canal Street, NYC) of the 60's and earlier -- no more Allied Radio -- it's RS or nothing, seems to me.)
David
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Man, that's sure an interesting approach!
David
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On Mon, 6 Feb 2012 19:24:49 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

simple and "code free" way of doing it.
But if the transformer is the only load there is no reason NOT to just use a "plug-in" transformer in the first place. The transformer can be a "wall wart" style - which IS designed to be plugged in and meets all the code requirements for a "plug-in" connection for all the chicken-littles worried about being code compliant.
Most likely a 24 volt unit - possibly an 18 volr - like a doorbell transformer. About 2 amps secondary. HTP2450 Honeywell is 2 amp 24 volt AC with thermal overload protection that plugs into any 15 amp NEMA outlet.
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wrote:

another electrical/heating contractor in Albuquerque, and another in Palmer Alaska all indicate it is "common practice" to have the furnace connected by a twist-lock plug to a receptacle. An electrician in Central PA says they do it all the time - it IS against code but the inspectors all allow it.
The reason given for not allowing it is flexible cords did not stand up to the temperatures that could be expected in the furnace wiring cabinet. Flexible cords are used on electric space heaters and other heating appliances - so high temperature cord is available - and used.
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Well, there you have it.Four guys in four cities, sounds like a settled argument to me!!!
However it doesn't jibe with what my UPS guy told me
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