SIMPLE electrical job. Cost via electrician? chg direct-wire to plug & socket

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On 2/3/2012 8:37 PM, RBM wrote:

I spoke with an insurance underwriter, their position is:
1. During a power outage, they prefer that you take reasonable steps to keep your pipes from freezing and causing thousands in damage to your home.
2. They would rather have you run your gas or oil furnace off of an extension cord and a genset than use one of those portable kerosene or propane heaters.
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On 2/4/2012 11:59 AM, Bernt Berger wrote:

Absolutely, and this string is about how to do just that, properly, not just in an emergency situation where you would just disconnect the boiler from it's normal power supply and connect it to a cord and plug for generator power.
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HEY, I LIKE THAT!!!
David
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OK, but how to attach the (male) twist-lock plug to the end of my 100' #12 extension cord?
Thanks,
David
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This person is in Canada, and assumes you have a generator with a twist lok outlet on it, and assumes that this wiring meets boiler code in your particular area, which I can tell you unequivocally, it does not
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Where is the OP?
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On 2/6/2012 6:10 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

New Rochelle, NY
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Does his (currently instaled) draft inducer pass code?
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On 2/6/2012 6:11 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

No, but as gfretwell pointed out, most boiler wiring, or replacement boiler wiring is done without inspection, because there is already a C/O on the building wiring
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Generally speaking, Canadian codes are MORE STRICT than American codes when it comes to safety.
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On 2/6/2012 6:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Nec only plays one part in the central heating system safety. We have a variety of fire safety and life safety codes. In the area where the OP lives: all central heating systems need a disconnect "within sight from" the unit. This is an Nec rule. It means within sight of, and not more than 50 feet away. If the heating system is sitting in an open basement, there must be an additional disconnect at the top of the stairs to the basement. If there is a boiler room, the additional disconnect can be outside of the boiler room The idea is that the service man kills the switch that he can see, but if the unit shouldmalfunction, it can be killed without going near it.
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On 2/6/2012 11:10 AM, David Combs wrote:

Amazon has them.
Leviton 2311 20 Amp, 125 Volt, NEMA L5-20P, 2P, 3W, Locking Plug, Industrial Grade, Grounding - Black-White
Accepts 16-10 AWG Cord range: .385 - .780
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On 2/2/2012 3:08 PM, David Combs wrote:

Here you go, all UL Listed and legal
http://www.reliancecontrols.com/ProductDetail.aspx?TF151W
I've got one on my gas furnace and it works great. No more frozen pipes when the power goes out.
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Should interface with this, just fine?
http://www.harborfreight.com/50-ft-x-12-gauge-outdoor-extension-cord-41444.html
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Here you go, all UL Listed and legal
http://www.reliancecontrols.com/ProductDetail.aspx?TF151W
I've got one on my gas furnace and it works great. No more frozen pipes when the power goes out.
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In my opinion, HF is a schlock merchant. I would expect that extension cord to be a cheap piece of shit made from China's finest toxic waste. I'd also expect the cord to fail within the first few hours of use.
For just a few dollars more you can get a top-quality cord made in USA that will last for decades.
Amazon has one for $44 US Wire 99050 12/3 50-Foot SJEOW TPE Cold Weather Extension Cord Blue with Lighted Plug
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On Thu, 02 Feb 2012 17:48:20 -0500, Harry Johnson

That would be my choice. Easy to DIY, but also simple if you have to pay an electrician. He will probably charge the minimum for a call. Around here, that is about $100.
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On 2 Feb 2012 15:08:43 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

This solenoid is most likely operated by a transformer with a secondary voltage of around 24 volts.
Working on low voltage wiring is easy to do and should not need to follow a lot of codes. Therefore, the simple solution is to not touch the AC supply voltage at all. Instead, buy an extra transformer to be powered from the generator. Install a DPDT (Double pole double throw) switch in a box, and connect this to secondary of both transformers. When the switch is flipped in one direction, the furnace will run the transformer from the power line. When flipped the other way, it will run from the generator. Label the switch so you know which way to flip the switch.
You can buy a switch like this at Radio Shack. You can also buy small aluminum boxes there to install it after drilling some holes in the box for the switch and the wires. A DPDT switch has 6 terminals on the back. The 2 middle ones go to the 2 wires going to the furnace. The 2 terminals on the left go to the transformer from the generator, the two on the right go to the 2 wires from the line powered transformer.
Find a buddy who plays around with electronics to help if you need help. There are ham radio guys and electronics experimenters all over the country. Maybe the Radio Shack clerk knows of someone, or call a few local TV repair shops.
Be sure to buy a transformer MADE for your furnace. Call a furnace repair shop.
Problem solved!
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On 02/02/2012 06:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

if you do that make sure the switch is a DPDT center-off switch, or at a bare minimum break before make. xfmrs can backfeed and that wouldn't be safe
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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On 2/2/2012 6:27 PM, Nate Nagel wrote:

It's a moot point. The OP has a draft inducer in the system which needs 120 volts
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Thanks for mentioning that.
Well, right now that fan is not *in* the system -- it's directly wired to the wall, and is on ALL THE TIME -- all four seasons.
(That was the strong advice of the plumber.)
Now, not only is having it running all the time going to wear out a lot sooner, but motors take more than a few watts. 24/7/52 can add up to a *LOT* of money.
(I just read an article somewhere that claimed that running a not-too-big fan 100% of the time came to $5,000 per year! Even if that's exaggerated, it's still probably over $1,000. Should get close and see if I can read the watts rating.)
Anyway, I think (unless you guys say not to) I'd like that fan to run only when the furnace is "on" (burning gas). Now, that would require some kind of solenoid-switch controlled by the same circuit that controls the opening of the gas-line into the burner, probably working at the same voltage as THAT (gas) solenoid, with at 110v switch open and closed by the new solenoid.
Hmmm. That controlled-switch would be inserted in the middle of the current power-line going from the wall to the fan.
So there'd *still* be no *electrical* connection between the fan and the furnace.
Now, it'd sure be nice if the current "oompf" controlling the gas-solenoid was strong enough to also control the second one! Would make life a lot easier than it might otherwise be.
(My "oompf" -- what's the correct terminology (or concept) for that. I guess it would be a perfectly, infinitely constant voltage source, regardless of the amps or load put on it.)
So maybe the "above" response is NOT a moot point, after all!
Hey, thanks for making me think!
David
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